Credit Course Descriptions

Please note that all courses listed are not offered every semester. Check the current schedule of classes for course offerings.

 

ACCT: Accounting

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ACCT 100-Business Accounting (3) Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 51 or ESL 97 or ESL 70 OR Corequisite: EN 75

Demonstrates the accounting principles and procedures used by a business in setting up and maintaining records for reporting purposes.

Topics include the accounting cycle, preparation of the financial statements, payroll and banking procedures, and computerized recordkeeping.

ACCT 101-Principles of Accounting I (3) Prerequisites: EN 70 OR (EN 50 and EN 51) OR (ESL 94 and ESL 97) OR (ESL 70 and ESL 71)

Introduces the principles and procedures related to accounting theory and practice. The analysis of transactions under generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and their relationship to the financial statements are covered from a user's perspective.

ACCT 102-Principles of Accounting II (3)

Prerequisite: ACCT 101

Continues the study of financial accounting principles and procedures from ACCT 101, with emphasis on the corporate form of business organization. Students will also be introduced to managerial accounting concepts used for

planning and controlling the business enterprise.

ACCT 111-Microcomputer Software Applications: Computerized Accounting (3) Prerequisites: (CIS 101 or COS 116D)

and (ACCT 100 or ACCT 101)

Demonstrates the use of commercial software in managing the accounting functions of a business enterprise. Using a hands-on approach,

students will learn how to set up a fully integrated accounting system to record sales invoices, collections, purchase invoices, disbursements, and payroll transactions. Students will also set up and maintain inventory and accounts receivable/payable subsidiary ledgers and prepare financial reports.

ACCT 117-Payroll Accounting (3)

Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (ACCT 100 or ACCT 101) Examines the concepts, regulations, laws and

procedures related to payroll accounting.

The course is comprehensive and detailed to prepare students to be competent to account for the payroll of all businesses. Includes hands- on preparation of all payroll forms, schedules, records, and applications of different systems.

ACCT 201-Intermediate Accounting I (4)

Prerequisite: (ACCT 100 & ACCT 101)

or (ACCT 101 & ACCT 102)

Reviews generally accepted accounting principles and the conceptual framework of financial accounting. Provides an intensive study of accounting procedures, work papers, financial statement preparation, and disclosure of financial statement items. Analyzes revenue

recognition concepts and the proper accounting for cash, receivables, and inventories.

ACCT 202-Intermediate Accounting II (4)

Prerequisites: ACCT 100 and ACCT 101, or ACCT 101 and ACCT 102, or ACCT 201

Provides an intensive study of accounting for tangible and intangible assets, current and non-current liabilities, stockholders’ equity, and investments. Emphasis is placed on proper accounting and financial statement disclosure of earnings per share, leases, deferred income

taxes, and accounting changes, with an analysis of time value of money applications.

ACCT 203-Managerial Cost Accounting (3)

Prerequisite: ACCT 101

Presents accounting information that is used by managers for planning, directing and controlling the business. Both short-term operational planning and long-term strategic planning concepts are covered. Specific topics include accounting for product costs vs. period costs, job-order costing and process costing, cost behavior analysis, Cost-

Volume-Profit (CVP) decision making, activity-abased and standard costing, and capital budgeting.

ACCT 205-Federal Income Tax Accounting (3)

Prerequisite: ACCT 100 or ACCT 101

Covers current federal revenue acts as they relate to business and individual tax procedures. Includes income inclusions and exclusions,

exemptions, capital gains and losses and business and individual deductions. Encourages use of tax forms but requires independent analysis of taxable status and handling income-expense items.

ACCT 206-Federal Taxation: Corporations and Partnerships (3) Prerequisite: ACCT 205

Focuses on the federal taxation rules as they apply to corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts.

ACCT 214-Auditing (3)

Prerequisites: ACCT 100 and ACCT 101

or ACCT 101 and ACCT 102

Examines auditing principles and their application to the examination of financial statements. Special attention to authoritative pronouncements, internal control, auditing procedures and working papers as well as professional ethics and responsibilities. Students perform an auditing case study outside of class.

ACCT 216-Governmental and Not- for-Profit Accounting (3)

Prerequisites: ACCT 100 and ACCT 101

OR ACCT 101 and ACCT 102

Introduces the environment, characteristics, principles, and practices associated with governmental and not-for-profit accounting. Major areas explored include fund accounting, fund types, revenue and expenditure recognition, and financial reporting.

ACCT 233-Applied Accounting (3) Prerequisites: ACCT 111, ACCT 201, CIS 111E Provides students with hands-on experiences

completing the daily duties and tasks required of a

staff accountant. During the first half of the course, students review the accounting concepts related to the duties and tasks. During the second half of the course, students apply their knowledge of accounting principles and procedures to complete the duties

and tasks. Students work in a simulated business environment using accounting application software.

 

ACE: Academic and

Career Engagement

ACE 100-Advanced Reading for Composition (2)

Prerequisites: (A grade of C or better in EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 51 or EN 52) and EN 61] OR (appropriate scores on the reading and writing placement tests) OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73); Corequisite: EN 101

Provides supplemental reading and writing support for students co-enrolled in English Composition (EN 101). The course targets critical reading strategies necessary for success in EN 101 and other college- level courses that require intensive reading. Students are guided to become independent readers capable of engaging in rigorous academic conversations.

ACE 101-Academic Engagement Seminar (3)

  • Gen Ed Emerging Issues; Cultural Competence Prerequisite or Corequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 OR Prerequisites: [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces first-year students to current, real- world issues as they advance their critical thinking, communication, and research skills. Students will explore questions of local, national, and global significance through multicultural contexts, while building relationships with their classmates,

    instructor, and other college personnel. Additionally, students will use campus resources and co- curricular events to enhance their educational experience and foster their college success.

    ACE 102-College Success Tools (1) Prerequisites: EN 70 OR (EN 50 and EN 51) OR (ESL 94 and ESL 97) OR (ESL 70 and ESL 71)

    Introduces students to tools, strategies, and resources designed to help build stronger academic

    foundations and make informed choices that will lead to college success. Students will plan their academic path, improve their study habits, and connect to campus and online resources to enhance their educational experience and achieve their goals.

    ACE 110-Career Assessment and Planning (3)

    Prerequisites: EN 70 OR (EN 50 and EN 51) OR (ESL 94 and ESL 97) OR (ESL 70 and ESL 71)

    Develops critical methods needed to make a satisfying career decision based on research and goal setting strategies that lead to personal and professional success. Students will acquire the skills needed to make informed choices abut their education and career. Students will evaluate their strengths, values, interests, and personality in order to identify possible career options. Students will learn techniques for researching career options and making decisions about their future while creating a learning/career portfolio upon which they can build throughout their college career.

     

    ACE 111A-Choosing a Major or Career (1) Provides tools and support for students to explore career options, majors, and credentials. Students will identify their own strengths, values, and interests and will prepare an academic

    plan to help them identify a course of study appropriate to their desired outcomes.

    ACE 111B-Job Search and Workplace Basics (1)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Develops key strategies to help students find satisfying work. Students will learn how to connect their employment objectives to their education and work experience. Topics include resume writing, interviewing, job search skills, and workplace basics.

    ACE 140-Introduction to Leadership (3)

  • Gen Ed Emerging Issues

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Examines leadership through an analysis of various leadership qualities and styles in the fields of business, government, the law, and the military.

    By utilizing a wide variety of sources, including readings, films, and experiential exercises, students will explore the concept of leadership as well as developing/improving their own leadership skills.

    ACE 201H-Honors Applied Leadership & Research (3)

    Prerequisite: Permission of Honors Coordinator Provides returning Honors students with the opportunity to serve as peer mentors or

    leaders of first-year Honors students as they

    explore current, real-world issues and further advance their critical thinking, communication, and research skills. Students will develop and explore questions of local, national, and global significance through multicultural contexts while building relationships with the instructor,

    classmates, and other college personnel. Students will refine research and presentation skills in preparation for academic conferences.

    ACE 250-Global Scholar Experience (3)

  • Gen Ed Emerging Issues; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: EN 101

    Develop cultural competency through short-term study abroad using a ‘learn, travel, teach’ model. The pre-trip component will introduce the concept of cultural competency, elements of culture,

    and an overview of the destination country’s/ies’ culture(s). During the study abroad portion, daily journaling or blogging will record and analyze the travel experience. Post-trip, a multimedia cultural competency project will be completed with faculty supervision and presented to an audience. Students who successfully complete all course requirements will be awarded a Global Scholar Certificate.

    course descriptions

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    AN: Anthropology

    AN 101-Introduction to Anthropology (3)

  • Gen Ed Anthropology; Cultural Competence Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Presents general patterns of the development of human culture and the basic principles of

    social anthropology and ethnology. Provides field work experience and emphasizes concepts of the modern practical views of anthropology.

    AN 103-Introduction to Archeology (3)

  • Cultural Competence

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Emphasizes archaeological tools, methods, interests and interpretations. Techniques of recording, preserving and organizing data will be practiced. Involves scouting of sites, test diggings and research of the known historical past. Provides a field study of the area.

    AR: Art

    AR 100-Introduction to the Creative Arts (3)

  • Gen Ed Arts; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces students to the areas of visual arts, dance, music, and theater through an exploration of representative works with a global perspective.

    The study of the creative arts will develop critical appreciation for the arts, enhance self- expression, and provide a better understanding of the human experience. Attendance at an art exhibition and two different live performances is required. The course meets the Maryland state approved Associate of Arts in Teaching degree.

    AR 101-Two Dimensional Art and Design (3)

  • Gen Ed Arts

    Prerequisite: EN 70 OR Prerequisites or Corequisites:

    EN 75 OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Investigates the concepts and principles of two-dimensional visual design using black and white through a series of design exercises of increasing complexity.

    AR 102-Three Dimensional Art and Design (3)

    Prerequisite: AR 101

    Builds on the design concepts of AR 101. Explores the principles of visual organization and communication using color and three-dimensional form.

    AR 103-The History of Art: Non-Western (3)

  • Gen Ed Arts; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Surveys the major developments in painting, sculpture, and architecture created in non- western cultures around the world. Emphasizes a global perspective and illuminates the historical/ artistic interaction of world cultures. Provides

    an overview of the visual arts created in India, China, Japan, Islam, Africa, Oceania, and the pre-Columbian cultures of North and South America. A visit to an art museum is required.

    AR 104-The History of Art: Prehistoric to Early Renaissance (3)

  • Gen Ed Arts; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Surveys the major developments in painting, sculpture and architecture from prehistoric times to the Italian Renaissance. Explores multi-

    cultural diversity through the study of the history of civilization, religion, myth, literature, politics and the human condition as manifested in the visual arts. A visit to an art museum is required.

    AR 105-The History of Art: Renaissance to Modern (3)

  • Gen Ed Arts; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Surveys the major developments in painting, sculpture and architecture from the Italian Renaissance to the present. Explores multi- cultural diversity through the study of the history of civilization, religion, myth, literature, politics and the human condition as manifested in the visual arts. A visit to an art museum is required.

    AR 106-Drawing I (3)

  • Gen Ed Arts

    Prerequisite: EN 70 OR Prerequisites or Corequisites:

    EN 75 OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Develops skills in using different drawing mediums and approaches. Emphasizes learning how to draw still life, landscape, drapery studies and experimental problems. Includes problems of scale and collage. Students will acquire a portfolio of drawings from studio work. Students must furnish supplies.

    AR 107-Drawing II (3)

    Prerequisite: AR 106

    A continuation of AR 106 with more complex drawing. Emphasizes arranging and understanding the various composition formats, picture planes and pictorial methods of expression found in drawing. Students must furnish supplies.

    AR 108-Painting I (3)

    Prerequisite: AR 101 or AR 106

    Introduces the fundamental concepts and techniques of painting in oils or acrylic. Compositional problems based on still-life, interior and exterior space will

    be explored. Students must furnish supplies.

    AR 109-Painting II (3)

    Prerequisite: AR 108

    A studio course in analysis of solutions to problems involved in oil or acrylic painting. Develops skills in the preparation of the canvas and in the production of representational, abstract and other styles of paintings.

    AR 113-Pottery I (3)

  • Gen Ed Arts

    Prerequisite: EN 70 OR Prerequisites or Corequisites:

    EN 75 OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Explores clay as a medium for the expression of art. Uses various production techniques,

    decorating and glazing methods to achieve well- conceived and designed objects of ceramic art.

    AR 114-Pottery II (3)

    Prerequisite: AR 113

    An advanced study into the nature of ceramic art. Skills and techniques learned in Pottery I are refined and advanced, chemical information and

    historical traditions are elaborated upon to prepare the student for the production of fine ceramic art.

    AR 115-Introduction to Color Theory and Design (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 OR Prerequisites or Corequisites:

    EN 75 OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces students to the basic principles and elements of color theory. Through lectures, still images, and in-class studio work, students will develop an awareness of color and a deeper understanding of color theory and practice.

    Topics include the scientific, psychological, and aesthetic aspects of color. Historic examples of color trends in art and design will also be discussed.

    AR 119-Pottery: The Wood Kiln (3)

    Prerequisite: AR 113

    Explores wood-firing as a medium for the expression of ceramic art. Uses various production techniques, decorating and glazing techniques, along with wood kiln firing methods to achieve well-conceived and well-designed objects of ceramic art.

    AR 203-Sculpture (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 OR Prerequisites or Corequisites:

    EN 75 OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces the three-dimensional processes of carving, modeling, casting and constructing sculptures. Gallery visits, discussions and critiques augment the student's personal studio experiences.

    AR 204-Illustration I (3)

    Prerequisite: AR 106

    Concentrates on the development of hand skills and concepts which are an important part of the technique and magic of picture making. Explores material resources and the preparation of art for reproduction such as

    advertising design, editorial and fiction illustration. Includes trips to professional design studios.

    AR 205-Illustration II (3)

    Prerequisite: AR 204

    Develops individual style and interpretation. While class assignments are given, individual preferences are welcomed and encouraged. Considers illustration for books, social comment, etc. Study and discussion of slides and sometimes films

    on the work of past masters and current trends. Critiques and discussions on works in progress.

    AR 206-Introduction to Figure Study I (3)

    Prerequisite: AR 106

    Offers an intensive study in drawing and painting of the human figure, action, volume, structure and anatomy.

    AR 207-Introduction to Watercolor I (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 OR Prerequisites or Corequisites:

    EN 75 OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Instruction in transparent watercolor techniques, including wash and dry brush, ink and watercolor and expanded uses such as intermixing with turpentine and charcoal and pastel.

    AR 210-Watercolor II (3)

    Prerequisite: AR 207

    Expands techniques developed in AR 207, emphasizing personal expression in watercolor painting. Explores the various advanced methods in watercolor painting, observing works of traditional and contemporary artists. Includes individual research required and museum visits.

    AR 213-Intermediate Sculpture (3)

    Prerequisite: AR 203

    Explores figurative and abstract directions in clay, plaster, welded steel and/or assemblage.

    Emphasizes a wide range of materials and techniques and their resulting aesthetic statements

    ASLS: American Sign Language Studies

    ASLS 100-American Sign Language Fingerspelling and Numbering (3) Prerequisite: ASLS 102; Corequisite: ASLS 103

    Provides an in-depth study of American Sign Language Fingerspelling and Numbering. ASL Fingerspelling and Numbering is a crucial component of ASL. Focuses on developing receptive and expressive fingerspelling and numbering skills.

    Through class activities, this course covers names of people, cities, states, titles of books, movies, brand names, and lexicalized fingerspelling. This course also covers five systems in ASL Number Use: cardinal, ordinal, incorporation, unique, and sports system.

    ASLS 101-Visual Gestural Communication (3) Trains students visual acuity (receptive and expressive) and coordination of body movements. Emphasis is on mime, gestures and facial expressions. Through class activities and movement, students communicate without using the spoken voice. This class is designed to be a foundation for American Sign Language 1-3. It is recommended that ASLS

    102 be taken concurrently with ASLS 101.

    ASLS 102-American Sign Language I (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Presents the basic skills used in American Sign Language. Includes vocabulary and grammar related to the exchange of personal information, introductions and negotiating the environment of sign conversation. Uses

    workbooks and videotapes. (First of four courses in ASL. Credit by examination is available.)

    ASLS 103-American Sign Language II (ASL II) (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: ASLS 102

    A continuation of American Sign Language I. Further develops communication competencies in sign language above the basic level. Introduces transcription symbols, sentence types, time pronominalization, subjects and objects, classifiers, locatives, pluralization and temporal and distributional aspects. Develops receptive/ expressive skills. Features additional information about the deaf community and deaf culture.

    ASLS 106-Introduction to Deaf Community and History (3)

  • Gen Ed Emerging Issues; Cultural Competence Introduces students to the American Deaf Community through historical events. Topics include the development of American Sign Language, modes of communication, laws concerning Deaf people, professions within the Deaf community, education of Deaf children, and the importance and value of Deaf Culture.

    ASLS 107-Introduction to Deaf History (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99)

    OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73), and ASLS 106

    Explores Deaf History from 355 B.C. to present day. Introduces significant individuals in history who were Deaf or influenced the Deaf culture. Explores the development of the first university for the Deaf and an island that was inhabited primarily by Deaf individuals. Examines how technology and inventions have improved and changed the lives of Deaf Society over time.

    Explores education of the Deaf and unique issues.

    ASLS 202-American Sign Language III (ASL III) (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: ASLS 103

    A continuation of American Sign Language II. Emphasizes ASL grammar, vocabulary development and the deaf culture. Expands dialogue, short stories, narratives, short conversations and both receptive and expressive skills. Emphasizes signing techniques as well as signing speed and accuracy.

    ASLS 203-American Sign Language IV (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: ASLS 202

    A continuation of ASL III. Features comprehension of medium and longer stories, narratives and dialogues presented by the instructor and deaf ASL users. Students express self-generated stories. Presents hypothetical issues and problems.

    Includes interaction with the deaf community in both directed and non-directed activities.

    ASLS 206-American Deaf Culture (3)

    Prerequisite: ASLS 106

    Examines the unique culture of the Deaf Community. Some topics covered include attitudes from and towards the Deaf, values (family, social, political), humor, storytelling, athletics, performing arts,

    jokes, organizations, clubs, educational issues, and the diversity of membership. Reviews how new advances in technology have changed the culture.

    ASLS 211-ASL Linguistics (3) Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72) and (ASLS 203 and ITR 104);

    Corequisite: ITR 110, ITR 112, and ITR 114 Introduces students to the linguistics of American Sign Language (ASL) and English. Provides

    an introductory study of the phonological,

    morphological, lexical, syntactic, and discourse. Reviews the similarities and differences between signed languages and spoken languages.

    Introduces basic theories regarding ASL structure and emphasizes ASL status as a natural language by comparing and contrasting similarities

    and unique differences between the two.

    BI: Biological Science

    BI 55-Preparation for Allied Health (0) [3]

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR (EN 50 and EN 51)

    OR (ESL 94 and ESL 97) OR (ESL 70 and ESL 71) OR

    (Corequisite: EN 75) AND (MA 81 or MA 83 or MA 85 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Presents basic science concepts and science study skills. A preparatory course for students who have limited science background.

    BI 100-Fundamental Concepts of Biology (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 81 or MA 83 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA 206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test OR Prerequisite or Corequisite: MA 105)

    Explores basic biological concepts involved in understanding the structure, function, and

    evolution of organisms. Introduces organization of living matter, metabolism, genetics, evolution, and ecology, and their application to everyday life.

    This one semester laboratory course is intended for non-STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) majors, and is designed to provide students with an appreciation of biological concepts and their current applications. Meets the requirement for a general education science lab course.

    BI 101-Principles of Biology I (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 130 or MA 130S or MA 206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test OR Prerequisite or Corequisite: MA 111)

    Explores the basic biological principles common to all living organisms, including biological chemistry, bioenergetics and metabolism, cellular and molecular biology, and classical and molecular genetics. Methods of scientific inquiry and data analysis are studied and practiced. BI 101 is the first of a two semester series that together with

    BI 102 is a comprehensive survey of modern biology and is intended for STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) majors and pre-allied health majors. Meets the requirement for a general education science lab course.

    BI 102-Principles of Biology II (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisite: BI 101

    Continues the comprehensive survey of modern biology begun in BI 101 with an emphasis on mechanisms of evolution, methods of phylogenetic reconstruction and analysis, diversity of life, and ecology. Surveys biological diversity of all eukaryotic domains and kingdoms, including the study of various anatomical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations for life in different habitats. Select vertebrate body systems are studied. Intended

    for STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) majors. Meets the requirement for a general education science lab course.

    BI 103-Anatomy and Physiology (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR

    (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 130 or MA 130S or MA 206 or MA 206A or

    MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test OR Prerequisite or Corequisite: MA

    111) AND (BI 55 or BI 101 or BI 120 or CH 101)

    The first course in a two-semester sequence.

    Presents a study of physiology according to the body systems approach. Emphasizes

    relationships between form and function at both the microscopic and gross levels of organization. Includes basic anatomical terminology, concepts of cell biology, histology, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system, special senses and endocrine system.

    BI 104-Anatomy and Physiology (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisite: BI 103

    The second course in a two-semester sequence. Includes the cardiovascular system, lymphatic system and immunity, respiratory system, digestive system and metabolism, urinary system, fluid/electrolyte balance, acid/base balance, and reproductive system.

    BI 107-Human Biology (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73); AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA 105 or MA 206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Presents a study of the human body and its relationships to health, disease, and the environment. Covers basic concepts of anatomy, physiology, genetics, cancer, disease, immunology, aging, human evolution and/or related topics. Incorporates case studies, group work and information technology.

    For the non-science major. Meets the requirement for a general education science lab course. Students cannot receive credit for both BI 107 and BI 117.

    BI 117-Study of the Human Body (3)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73); (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA105 or MA206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Examines the human body and its relationships to health, disease, and the environment. Covers basic concepts of anatomy, physiology, genetics, cancer, disease, immunology, aging, human evolution, and/or other related topics. Incorporates case studies, group work, and information technology. For the non-science major. Students cannot receive credit for both BI 117 and BI 107.

    BI 120-Microbiology for Allied Health (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR

    (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 130 or MA 130S or MA 206 or MA 206A or

    MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test OR Prerequisite or Corequisite: MA

    111) AND (BI 55 or BI 101 or BI 103 or CH 101)

    For allied health students. Covers the basic principles of cell chemistry and microbiology with respect to human physiology. Includes cell physiology, growth and metabolism of microorganisms, import groups of pathogenic microorganisms, antimicrobial agents, immunology and introductory biochemistry.

    BI 130-Forensic Biology (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA 105 or MA 206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Introduces the principles and concepts of the biological aspects of forensic science.

    Examines the role of the laboratory in criminal investigation and human identification using forensic pathology, serology, anthropology, molecular biology, and other specializations.

    BI 140-Biotechnology and Society (3)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA 105 or MA 206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Presents an overview of biotechnology and its scientific foundation through introductory

    investigations of the cell, protein structure and function, genetic expression, ecological and evolutionary interactions, and technological applications and issues. Introduces how science blends with consumer applications, regulatory information and social issues to provide a detailed perspective of the interrelationship among science, technology and society. May include one or more mandatory field trips, and/or guest lecturers.

    BI 201-General Ecology (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA105 or MA206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Provides an overview of the interactions among living things and their abiotic environments, emphasizing factors which affect the abundance and distribution of living things. The laboratory will focus on using field experiences to develop topics covered in the lecture. Some Friday, Saturday or overnight field trips.

    BI 202-Human Ecology (3)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA 105 or MA 206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Investigates physical environments of human beings and the effect of technologies on the environment. Emphasizes small group investigations of air, water and soil pollution and the rapidly expanding population as it affects the natural ecosystem within Frederick County and the Eastern seaboard. Some Friday or Saturday field trips.

    BI 203-Elements of Microbiology (4) Prerequisites: CH 101 and BI 101 or BI 103 Introduces microbiology. Includes basic study of morphology, physiology, genetics and ecology

    of microorganisms, with an introduction to infectious diseases and immunology.

    BI 220-Cell Biology and Tissue Culture (4)

    Prerequisites: BI 101 and CH 101

    Introduces cellular organization, regulation, energy transport, and division. Discusses gene expression and interaction in relation to cellular biology. Presents tissue culture in the laboratory setting as a medium for bioprocess manufacturing. May include one or more mandatory field trips and/or guest lecturers.

    BI 240-Genetics (4)

    Prerequisites: BI 101 and CH 101

    Includes history of genetics, the chemical basis of heredity, the chromosomes and genes, probability, variation in gene structure, mutation, extrachromosomal systems and genes flow in populations.

    BLD: Building Trades

    BLD 101-Introduction to Building Trades (3) Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 51 or ESL 97 or ESL 70 Introduces general aspects of building trades,

    the building process, and its phases. Emphasizes

    health and safety issues related to the building trades. Explores print reading, building design, building site planning, site preparation, and estimating as it relates to construction. Includes an overview of applicable equipment and materials required in the building trades.

    BLD 108-Duct Design & Installation (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: BLD 109

    Covers duct installation, sizing, making take- offs, modifications, and unit tie-ins. Lectures will cover safety, sizing methods, types of tools used, duct types and applications. In a lab setting, students will learn hands-on how to measure, cut, modify, and install ductwork for various applications. CFM measurements and airflow troubleshooting will also be covered.

    BLD 109-Fundamentals of HVACR (4) Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 51 or ESL 97 or ESL 70 OR Corequisite: EN 75

    Covers fundamentals of heating, cooling, ventilation, humidity control, and basic refrigeration. Students will receive hands-on experience in a lab setting.

    BLD 110-Controls for HVACR (3)

    Prerequisite: BLD 109 or permission of program manager

    Covers the topics of controls in HVACR with respect to thermostats; pressure, safety and temperature devices; and valves. In a lab environment students will be able to identify and apply usage of these components.

    BLD 113-HVAC Installation & Troubleshooting (3) Prerequisite: BLD 110 or BLD 112 or permission of program manager

    Teaches basics of troubleshooting, installation, service and preventative maintenance techniques of HVAC equipment. Course includes EPA CFC certification. Hands-on experience will be conducted in a lab setting where students will demonstrate and apply these techniques.

    BLD 114-Fossil Fuels & Hydronic Heating (3)

    Prerequisite: BLD 110 or BLD 112 or permission of program manager

    Covers the topics of fossil fuel heating devices, hydronic and forced air equipment. Students will apply troubleshooting, installation, service, and preventative maintenance techniques

    on these systems in a lab setting.

    BLD 120-Welding Symbols & Blueprint Reading (2)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 51 or ESL 97 or ESL 70 OR Corequisite: EN 75 Introduces various types of prints used in

    the welding industry. Topics include print

    reading, measurements, metallurgy, types of welds and joints, and welding symbols.

    BLD 121-Introduction to Welding (4) Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 51 or ESL 97 or ESL 70 OR Corequisite: EN 75

    Introduces the basic processes in the welding field. Emphasizes welding safety. Introduces the various types of welding equipment,

    identification and selection of filler material, types of welds, and the different welding positions.

    BLD 122-Advanced Welding: SMAW (4) Prerequisite: BLD 121; Prerequisite or Corequisite: BLD 120 Focuses on Shielded Metal Arc Welding

    (SMAW). Students will perform a SMAW welding

    performance qualification test on limited thickness test plates in the 2G and 3G positions on carbon steel in accordance with American Welding Society D1.1 Structural Welding Code; this leads to an in-house certification.

    BLD 125-Advanced Welding: GTAW (3) Prerequisite: BLD 121; Prerequisite or Corequisite: BLD 120

    Introduces Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) on carbon steel, stainless steel, and aluminum. Topics include welding safety, basic machine maintenance, and welding techniques.

    BLD 127-Advanced Welding: GMAW (3) Prerequisite: BLD 121; Prerequisite or Corequisite: BLD 120

    Focuses on Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW), and oxyfuel cutting on carbon steel. Students will develop skills to weld groove welds in multiple positions. Students will perform GMAW and FCAW welder performance qualification testes on limited thickness test plates on carbon steel in accordance with American Welding Society D1.1 Structural Welding Code.

    BLD 128-Advanced Welding: SMAW 4G (3)

    Prerequisite: BLD 122

    Focuses on Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) and oxyfuel and Plasma Arc cutting on carbon steel.

    Students will complete a SMAW welder performance qualification test on limited thickness test plates

    in the 4G position on carbon steel in accordance with American Welding Society D1.1 Structural Welding Code. Leads to an in-house certification.

    BLD 141-Fundamentals of Structural Wiring (4)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 51 or ESL 97 or ESL 70 OR Corequisite: EN 75

    Covers basic principles and fundamentals of electricity and electrical work. Course will include components of schematics and blueprints, importance and role of the National Electrical Code, and safety. Students will receive hands-on experience with tools of the trade, wiring, and installing components of accessory terminations.

    BLD 142-Residential Electric (3)

    Prerequisite: BLD 141 or permission of program manager Advances student knowledge in the National Electrical Code (NEC) and its application. Topics

    covered will include NEC calculations, as well

    as print reading, circuitry, schematics, materials, and circuit testing. Hands-on applications

    will be conducted in a lab setting.

    BLD 145-Commercial Electric (3)

    Prerequisite: BLD 142 or permission of program manager

    Continues the concepts and skills covered in the first two courses of the electrical building trades program. This course covers wiring methods mainly used in commercial construction. Topics covered to include: conduit (bending, installation), commercial lighting (fluorescent, HID), and transformers.

    Students will also have an overview of the applicable sections of the National Electrical Code (NEC), including box/conduit fill, and load calculations.

    BLD 146-Specialized Systems (3)

    Prerequisite: BLD 141 or permission of program manager Covers topics in the electrical field such as CAT5, CAT6, CATV, fiber optics, fire alarms, photovoltaic,

    and electric controls. Students will receive hands-on

    experience working with materials and components in a lab setting. Students will also be introduced to the National Electrical Code (NEC) codes governing these various sub-fields to the electrical industry.

    BPM: Bioprocessing Technology

    BPM 102-Bioprocessing Environment (3) Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Presents the tenets of Current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMPs) and regulations relevant to the bioprocess manufacturing industry. Importance

    of inspections and monitoring are discussed. Work-related issues are introduced, such as workplace conduct, employer expectations, company organization and policy, personal safety, and industrial hygiene. May include one or more mandatory field trips and/or guest lecturers.

    BPM 103-Laboratory Techniques I (1) Prerequisites: Completion of high school biology or chemistry is strongly recommended AND (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA105

    or MA206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Focuses on the basic principles and procedures used in all laboratory courses. Includes

    safety, equipment usage, areas of the lab and testing involved, quality control/quality assurance, lab math, and professionalism.

    BPM 110-Bioprocessing Measurements (4)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: BPM 103

    Examines methods of measurement and monitoring used in bioprocessing. Emphasizes pH, temperature, pressure and flow rates, as well as spectrophotometry, and biochemical and chemical analytical methods.

    BPM 214-Techniques in Bioproduction (4) Prerequisites: BI 120 or BI 203, BPM 102, BPM 110 Introduces practices used in the industry to manufacture a biological material or product, as

    well as problem-solving strategies. Emphasizes and demonstrates aseptic technique, upstream and downstream processes, and quality control through hands-on laboratory activities.

    BU/MA: Business/ Mathematics

    BU/MA 205-Business Statistics (3)

  • Gen Ed Math

    Prerequisites: (MA 81 or MA 83 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test) and (CIS 101 or CIS 111E or CIS 116E) and (placement in EN 70 or ESL 70 or higher on the reading placement test)

    Introductory non-calculus statistics course for business using spreadsheets. Topics include descriptive analysis and treatment of data, probability, statistical inference, linear regression and correlation, chi-square tests and non-parametric tests. Students can only receive credit for one of the following: BU/ MA 205 or BU/MA 205A. Business Administration students must take BU/MA 205 (not BU/MA 205A).

    BU: Business Studies

    BU 103-Introduction to Business (3) Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR

    (ESL 72 and ESL 73) OR Corequisite: EN 75 Introduces effective use of planning, organization and control in the management

    of an enterprise. Introduction to finance,

    personnel and plant management, marketing and business and government relations.

    BU 107-Business Mathematics (3)

    Covers the mechanics of computation and fundamentals of problemsolving in such practical applications as statistics, percentage, interest, partial payments, distributions, payroll and graphs.

    BU 109-Entrepreneurship & Small Business Enterprise (3)

    Explores starting and successfully managing a small business. Includes making the decision for self-employment, getting started (new business, going concern, franchising), marketing the product or service, achieving proactive financial

    management, a miscellany of management pointers for small businesses (personnel/inventory/control/ managing risk) and regulations and taxes.

    BU 110-Personal Financial Management (3) Develops a well-rounded approach to managing personal finances. Includes financial planning, budgeting, financing consumer purchases, risk control, investments and retirement planning.

    BU 140-Agricultural Business (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces the principles of management in modern agricultural business and farm production. Emphasizes small agricultural

    businesses including crops, livestock, agritourism, sustainable agriculture, small acreage operations, and high value agricultural enterprises (e.g., viticulture, organic produce, aquaculture).

    The course will cover marketing, operations, finance, and human resources, as well as general management issues in an agricultural business.

    BU 211-Business Law I (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Introduces business law and its application to business activity. Includes contracts, agency and employment, negotiable instruments and sales.

    BU 221-Public Relations (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces basic principles that business and administrative organizations have found to be successful in building and maintaining favorable public relations. Attention to the various tools of public relations such as the broadcast media, newspapers, periodicals, brochures, photographs and exhibits.

    BU 223-Human Resource Management (3) Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces basic concepts of Human Resource (HR) Management in organizations. Provides an overview of the primary elements of HR management, including human resource planning, recruitment, selection, training and development, performance management and employee motivation/

    retention, compensation and benefits, workplace safety, labor relations, and legal/ethical issues.

    BU 225-Marketing (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Explores problems and organization of systems that distribute goods and services in the business world. Promotion through retail and wholesale parallels; consumer buying habits; pricing, budgeting, transportation and warehousing; and sources and uses of marketing information.

    BU 227-Principles of Management (3) Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Provides an introduction to basic principles of management in business and other organizations. Emphasizes management functions including planning, organizing, staffing, directing, controlling and coordinating. Explores the role leaders play in strategic planning, change management, innovation, decision making, and motivating employees/teams.

    BU 273-Business Communications (3) Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Emphasizes the theory and practice of oral, written, and interpersonal communication used in the workplace. Classroom activities and assignments will focus on writing business correspondence and reports, planning

    and delivering effective presentations, and developing teamwork and collaboration skills.

    BU 274-Customer Relations (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Examines the role of customer relations in business and emphasizes the theory and practice of developing, fostering and managing relationships between the company and the customer. The course will focus on those practices that lead to customer loyalty and retention. Value equation applications and a systems approach to service excellence

    are introduced in the course. The course will also address building excellent customer relations into the mission of the company and committing to customer service as competitive advantage.

    BU 275-Fundamentals of Leadership (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 50A or EN 61 or ESL 95 or ESL 73

    Emphasizes the theory and real-time practice of leadership skills used in the workplace. Classroom activities and assignments will focus on strategies for navigating change, leading with priorities in mind, managing conflict, giving and receiving constructive feedback, visioning, preparing mission statements, and setting goals.

    BU 281-Global Awareness in the Work Environment (3)

  • Gen Ed Emerging Issues; Cultural Competence Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Promotes student awareness of the cultural diversity in the workplace whether in the US with multicultural coworkers or abroad. Stresses student thinking about the global work environment

    by analyzing and applying course information. Utilizes a variety of classroom and Internet activities and projects to develop an understanding of the workplace cultural surroundings.

    BU 290-Project Management (3)

    Prerequisite: CIS 101

    Introduces concepts and practices of project management and their universal application to all types of organizations. Students will analyze the roles of the project manager and project team and utilize techniques for effective project planning, management, control, closeout, and evaluation.

    CAD: Computer Aided Design

    CAD 101-Introduction to AutoCAD I (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: EN 52 or EN 70 or EN 75 or ESL 99 or ESL 72

    Introduces AutoCAD software and its application as a drawing tool. Students will utilize basic AutoCAD commands to create two-dimensional production and architectural drawings. Students will use templates, layer control, dimensioning, editing, text, symbol creation, and blocks to create and modify geometrical designs and print/plot drawings for presentation.

    CAD 102-Introduction to AutoCAD II (3)

    Prerequisite: CAD 101

    Continues the study of AutoCAD at an intermediate level. Students will create pictorial views and

    three dimensional drawings. Students will be introduced to additional CAD systems (Autodesk Architecture, Revit, Civil 3D, and Microstation).

    CAD 130-Introduction to Revit (BIM) (3) Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 51 or ESL 97 or ESL 70 Introduces students to Autodesk Revit software, a Building Information Modeling (BIM) program,

    and its application as a design/drawing tool throughout the design process. Allows students to design structural components in 3D, annotate with 2D drafting elements, and access building information from the building models database.

    image

    CAD 200-Introduction to Architectural Drawing and Design (3)

    Prerequisite: CAD 101

    Introduces basic principles and concepts of architectural drawing and design, and their application. Develops an understanding of programming and schematic design. Introduces fundamental drawing practices, drawing systems, and presentation techniques. Students will create architectural sketches, drawings, and models.

    CAD 201-Residential Architecture I (4)

    Prerequisite: CAD 102

    Introduces the basics of residential architecture. Content covers the language of architecture, the makeup of a set of plans, and the geometry of drawing parts of houses. Students will complete a set of plans and work with various disciplines for one house. Plans will be completed in AutoCad.

    CAD 202-Residential Architecture II (4)

    Prerequisite: CAD 201

    Introduces the use of AutoCad in preparing construction documents and 3-dimensional models of buildings. Architecture terminology, building techniques, building conventions, building design, and architecture-related information will

    be introduced. Students will complete a set of plans and work with various disciplines for one house. Plans will be completed using AutoCad.

    CAD 204-Introduction to Inventor (3)

    Prerequisite: CAD 102

    Introduces Autodesk Inventor software and its application as a design/drawing tool. This course covers basic and advanced Autodesk Inventor features used to create, edit, document, and print parts and assemblies.

    CAD 205-Civil Drafting I with CAD (3)

    Prerequisite: CAD 102

    Introduces fundamental concepts of civil drafting and design of civil engineering projects. Students will explore career fields in civil engineering and design including survey, land development, environmental, highway, and utilities. Students will use CAD software to create and revise civil drawings including site surveys, plot plans, record plats, utility drawings, and plan profiles. Students will develop an understanding of the relationship of GIS applications to civil engineering.

    CAD 207-Civil Drafting II with CAD (3)

    Prerequisite: CAD 205

    Introduces intermediate/advanced concepts of civil drafting and design of civil engineering projects. Students will use 3D civil CAD software to create and revise civil engineering drawings including survey drawings, highway layouts, profiles, site plans, corridors, sections, grading plans, cut and

    fill drawings, and other civil detail drawings.

    CH: Chemistry

    CH 100-Chemistry and Society (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA105 or MA206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Intended for non-science majors. Explores important concepts of modern chemistry. Emphasizes connection between basic scientific principles and the current technologies of our society. Laboratory experiments illustrate the process of scientific discovery. No background in science is required. Will not serve as a prerequisite for CH 102, CH 201 or advanced science courses. For non-science majors.

    CH 101-General Chemistry (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: Completion of high school chemistry strongly recommended AND (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL

    99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 130 or MA 130S or MA 206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test OR Prerequisite or Corequisite: MA 111)

    Intended for science majors, technology majors and pre-allied health majors. Examines the concepts underlying modem chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, bonding,

    states of matter and solutions. Laboratory experiments illustrate the lecture material.

    CH 102-General Chemistry (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisite: CH 101

    Continues examining the concepts underlying modem chemistry, including kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base theory, nuclear chemistry, electro- chemistry, chemistry of the elements and an introduction to organic and biochemistry. Laboratory experiments illustrate the lecture material.

    CH 201-Organic Chemistry (4)

    Prerequisite: CH 102

    Presents the hydrocarbon and derivatives, emphasizing bonding, structure, nomenclature, methods of preparation, reaction and reaction mechanisms. Laboratory emphasizes common techniques, synthesis of representative compounds.

    CH 202-Organic Chemistry (4)

    Prerequisite: CH 201

    Continues to present the hydrocarbon and derivatives, emphasizing bonding, structure, nomenclature, methods of preparation, reaction and reaction mechanisms. Laboratory emphasizes common techniques, synthesis of representative compounds and qualitative organic analysis.

    CIS: Computer and Information Sciences

    CIS 101-Information Systems and Technology (3)

  • Gen Ed Computer Literacy

    Prerequisite: EN 70 OR Prerequisites or Corequisites:

    EN 75 OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Explores the fundamentals of information systems and relevant technologies. This course surveys

    the terminologies, types, components, functions, architectures, and development life cycle of information systems. Topics include roles, values, impacts, applications, security concerns, social issues, ethics, and responsibilities related to the use of information systems in businesses. Students also learn productivity applications, such as word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database software.

    CIS 103-Keyboarding (3)

    A series of individual courses leading to increased skills in keyboard use.

    CIS 103A-Introductory Keyboarding (3) Develops typewriting skills and techniques. Covers basic procedures such as typing personal and business letters, envelopes, centering, tabulation and manuscripts. Goal is at least 30 words per minute. Course may be waived upon examination.

    CIS 103B-Executive Keyboarding (3)

    Prerequisite: CIS 103A

    Helps students with keyboarding experience to further their skills in the area of administrative or executive office skills. Students identify their speed and accuracy problems, develop practice routines to help correct those problems, and learn basic and advanced business formatting. Teaches how to prepare employment documents, how to handle

    office tasks, how to edit and abstract written materials, and how to make decisions and set priorities.

    CIS 103C-Keyboarding for the Business and Health Care Professional (3)

    Note: In order for students to be successful in this course, students should demonstrate the ability to type by touch a minimum of 25 words a minute with three or less errors for three minutes. There are many online sites to test typing speed and accuracy. Students will be tested at the first class meeting.

    Designed for students who can keyboard by touch, have keyboarding experience, and want to further their expertise in the area of business and medical administrative office skills. Students will identify their speed and accuracy problems, develop practice routines to help correct those problems, and learn basic and advanced business and medical administrative document formatting. Emphasis

    will be placed on how to prepare employment and patient documents, how to handle office tasks, how to edit and abstract written materials, and how to make decisions and set priorities.

    CIS 106-Object Design and Programming (3)

  • Gen Ed Computer Literacy

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    AND Prerequisite or Corequisite: MA 81 or MA 83 or MA 85 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test Covers basics of object-oriented programming,

    fundamentals of computer information systems,

    impact of information technology on the economic, political and cultural development of society as

    well as the ethical, societal, and legal aspects of information technology. Students will design, implement, document, and debug object-oriented programs to solve problems by utilizing various data types and algorithms, control structures, encapsulation, and inheritance. Students will participate in structured walkthroughs and discussions, create Unified Modeling Language (UML) diagrams in designing solutions, and

    debug errors within the designed solutions. Requires no prior programming experience.

    CIS 107-Introduction to Programming (2) Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and

    ESL 73) OR Corequisite: EN 75 or ESL 72 or ESL 73 Introduces programming and is aimed at students with no prior programming knowledge or

    skills. Covers basics of programming including

    variables, decision-making statements, and iterative statements. Students create logical solutions to novel problems using tools such as pseudocode and flowchart. Students write, test, and run elementary programs to solve problems using a high-level programming language.

    CIS 111-Microcomputer Software Applications (3)

    A series of individual courses involving various state-of-the-art microcomputer software application packages. Courses include:

    CIS 111A-Microcomputer Software Applications: Word Processing (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 101 or CIS 106 or CIS 116D Covers the basic, intermediate and advanced features of word processing. Students create, edit, format and

    save personal and business documents. Along with

    data integration, special features such as mail merge, sorting, styles, columns, footnotes, outlines, table

    of contents, indexes, and templates are presented.

    CIS 111B-Microcomputer Software Applications: Database (3) Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 101 or CIS 106

    Covers the basic and advanced features of a commercial database software package. Students plan, define and use a database;

    perform queries; produce reports and forms; work with multiple files; and learn the basic concepts of database programming.

    CIS 111E-Microcomputer Software Applications: Spreadsheets (3) Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 101 or

    CIS 106 or CIS 116D or CIS 116F

    Covers the basic and intermediate features of a commercial spreadsheet software package. Students design a variety of worksheets and charts; create formulas and functions, work with a spreadsheet’s database features; apply ‘what if’ techniques and interchange data with other applications.

    CIS 111J-Microcomputer Software Applications: Web Page Development (3) Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 101, CIS 106, or CIS 116D Introduces modern web development tools

    for website construction. This course covers the topics relevant to the development of

    interactive websites, including conceptualization, design, layout, and visual stimulation. Students will learn HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript.

    CIS 111K-Microcomputer Software Applications: Practical Structured Cabling (3) Provides students with the fundamental skills to work with structured cabling systems that make up data and voice systems. This course will cover copper and fiber-optic cable types, installation, testing,

    and troubleshooting. Students will also learn about OSHA safety standards, applicable building codes, and industry standards. An overview of accrediting associations (e.g., BICSI, ETA) will be included.

    CIS 111L-UNIX/Linux Operating System (3)

    Prerequisite: CIS 101 or CIS 106

    Explores the practical use and operation of an

    open-source operating system (Linus/Unix). Students will learn how to use basic Unix commands,

    shell scripting, and various system utilities.

    CIS 111M-PC Operating Systems (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 101, CIS 106, CIS 116D, or CIS 212

    Explores the installation, configuration, and operations of operating systems. Students learn to set up, configure, troubleshoot, and maintain hardware devices and software applications on an

    operating system. Completion of this course will help prepare students for the A+ certification exam. It is recommended that students take this course and CIS 212-PC Repair & Diagnostics in the same semester.

    CIS 111R-Business Software Applications (3) Emphasizes an integrated approach. Covers different software applications, from spreadsheet

    to word processor, to graphs, to the file manager, to communication files. Provides numerous hands-on assignments and exercises. Students gain practical experience using a computer to solve problems that arise in the automated office environment.

    CIS 116-Microcomputer Software Applications (1)

    A series of short-term courses leading to increased skills in various state-of-the-art microcomputer software applications packages

    CIS 116B-Microcomputer Software Applications: Internet Home Page (1) Prerequisite: CIS 116D

    Learn how to create web pages using mark codes, link Web sites, include images and sound files and how to create user-friendly forms.

    CIS 116C-Microcomputer Software Applications: Presentation Graphics (1) Introduces the basic principles and terminology of presentation graphics software. Topics covered

    include but are not limited to creating slides, using charts and graphics, customizing information and controlling the design of an electronic presentation.

    Teaches how to make transparencies, 35mm slides and handout notes for a slide show.

    CIS 116D-Microcomputer Software Applications: Windows (1)

    Covers the basics of the Windows operating system from navigating with the mouse to customizing the desktop to managing files, directories and programs.

    CIS 116E-MS Applications Spreadsheets (1)

    Covers the basic and intermediate features of MS Excel 2013. Students design a variety of worksheets and graphs, create formulas, work with a spreadsheet’s database feature, apply ‘what if’ techniques, and exchange data with other applications.

    CIS 116F-Microcomputer Software Applications: Computer Fundamentals (1) Surveys computer basics including hardware, applications, operating systems, and communication networks. Students learn the components of hardware, applications of software in work

    place, variety of operating systems, and the basics of communication networks.

    CIS 116L-Microcomputer Software Applications: Software Integration (1) Prerequisites: CIS 111A, CIS 111E, CIS 116C

    Builds upon student's knowledge of the Microsoft Office Suite. Students cover the basics through advanced features of sharing data among Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint and Outlook.

    CIS 116P-Microcomputer Software Applications: Photoshop (1)

    Introduces the basic principles and terminology of graphics software used for web and print materials. Students will learn how to create, modify, and import images as well as merge and edit colors. Students will become familiar with both the MAC and PC platforms in this course.

    This course is recommended for students planning to take CMM 114 or CIS 111J.

    CIS 116Q-Microcomputer Software Applications: Macromedia Flash (1) Introduces the basic principles and terminology of Web media software. Students learn how to create interactive media including animated logos, Web site navigational controls, and media- rich elements that integrate with Web pages.

    image

    CIS 117-Data Science Essentials (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 OR Prerequisites or Corequisites:

    EN 75 OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces concepts and techniques of data collection and discovery as well as computer based data analysis tools. Surveys data wrangling, data journalism, data visualization, big data analytics, and data engineering technologies, such as Hadoop and MapReduce. Topics include the data organization and repository, data science process,

    inductive data-driven modeling, statistical inference, logistic regression, and exploratory data analysis.

    CIS 118-Data Analytics Using Spreadsheets (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 106 or CIS 111E

    Covers the theory and techniques of data modeling and data analysis using spreadsheets. Students learn to summarize data, explore data, produce accumulated data, and visualize data by utilizing spreadsheet software, such as MS Excel.

    CIS 119-Statistical Analysis System (SAS) (3)

    Prerequisite: CIS 106

    Covers the point-and-click interactive SAS Studio and basics of SAS programming. Students utilize SAS Studio to visualize and summarize data by creating reports, charts, and graphs as well as conduct statistical tests and analysis. Students also learn SAS programming capabilities necessary to process data from a variety of sources and to solve problems.

    CIS 140-Java Programming (3)

    Prerequisite: CIS 106

    Introduces Java programming language with an emphasis on object-oriented principles. Students utilize library classes in developing Java standalone applications and applets. Topics include Graphical User Interface (GUI) programming, event-driven programming, inheritance, and polymorphism.

    CIS 170-Security Fundamentals (3) Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 180 or CIS 190 Provides students with the knowledge and skills to implement, maintain and secure network

    services, network devices, and network traffic. Builds on foundational network concepts, computer hardware, and operating systems principles.

    CIS 173-Healthcare Information Technology (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 101 or CIS 106

    Prepares students to become healthcare information technology technicians. Topics covered include healthcare-related regulatory requirements, healthcare terminology/acronyms, medical

    business operations, electronic health records (EHRs), and healthcare specific security best practices. Students will obtain the knowledge and skills required to implement, deploy, and support health IT systems in medical facilities.

    CIS 175-Game Theory and Design (3) Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Covers game theory and design. Topics include the roles of game designers, game structures and elements as well as game development stages and methods. Students learn about designing, prototyping, and playtesting games.

    CIS 176-Game Creation (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 116D or CIS 116F (prerequisite only, course no longer offered) or CIS 116P or CIS 101 or CIS 106 or CIS 175

    Covers the creation of basic games. This hands-on course guides students step by step through the basics of building interactive games. Students learn to create computer games utilizing current technologies, such as web page design/development languages, animation/simulation software, and game engines.

    CIS 177-Interactive 3D Technology (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 116D or CIS 116F (prerequisite only, course no longer offered) or CIS 101 or CIS 106

    Surveys the current 3 dimensional (3D) technologies and introduces the design and creation of virtual interactive 3D models. Covered techniques include mesh modeling, texturing, lighting, rigging, animating, and rendering. Students learn to design and develop computer generated interactive 3D worlds using 3D production tools such as Blender.

    CIS 178-3D Modeling and Animation (3) Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 101 or CIS 106 or CIS 177 Introduces fundamentals of creating and animating 3 dimensional (3D) computer modeling. The industry

    standard 3D modeling and animation software are surveyed and explored. This course covers Autodesk Maya Certified Professional exam topics

    and objectives. Topics include 3D modeling concepts and 3D animation process. Students learn to create and animate 3D models using 3D modeling tools.

    CIS 179-Cybersecurity Fundamentals (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 106

    Introduces the Essential Body of Knowledge for IT security and the fundamentals of cybersecurity, including the cyber architecture, components

    of security practices, and cybersecurity-related legislative framework. Students learn to identify risks, threats, and vulnerabilities relevant to information technology resources and to analyze the significance of security models and issues associated with security management. Surveys the software lifecycle and software assurance.

    CIS 180-Networking Fundamentals (3)

    Prerequisite: CIS 106 or CIS 111M

    Reviews hardware, operating systems, and other networking principles. Includes

    comprehensive networking skill sets necessary for the CompTIA Network exam.

    CIS 190-Cisco 1 Network Fundamentals (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 106 or CIS 212 Covers networking fundamentals, Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) network reference model,

    and Transmission Control Protocol/Internet

    Protocol (TCP/IP). Topics include network topologies, protocols, IP addressing, subnet masks, and Ethernet. Students will also learn the basic network design and cable installation.

    CIS 191-Cisco 2 Routing Technologies (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 190

    Introduces the routing protocols and concepts, as well as the fundamentals of Cisco routers. Students learn to install, configure, customize, operate, maintain, and troubleshoot Cisco routers and relevant components.

    CIS 192-Cisco 3 Switching Technologies (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 191

    Surveys switching protocols, Local Area Networks (LANs), and LAN switching. Students will analyze, configure, verify, and troubleshoot routing protocols, including routing for IPv4 and IPv6, EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6, as well as OSPF for IPv4 and IPv6. This course also covers LAN switch operations and virtual private networks.

    CIS 193-Cisco 4 WAN Technologies (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 192

    Introduces the principles and implementation of Wide Area Networks (WANs). Topics include the traffic control and access control lists (ACLs), services and protocols for wide-area access, Point-to-Point (PPP) protocols and WAN, as well as the concepts and operations of frame relay. Students learn

    to configure, verify, and troubleshoot WANs.

    CIS 200-IT Support Services (3)

    Prerequisite: CIS 101, CIS 106, CIS 111M, or CIS 212 Introduces the fundamentals, operations, roles, and responsibilities of information technology (IT) support

    services. Students practice problem-solving and

    communication skills appropriate in the computer user-support environment. Best practices in customer support and professional work habits are emphasized throughout the course. Topics include incident identification, incident management, information collection skills, communication skills, personal

    skills, technical skills, security skills, troubleshooting skills, training skills, and business skills.

    CIS 201-Computer Science I (4)

    Prerequisites: MA 82 or MA 85 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test and [CIS 140 (prerequisite or corequisite) or minimum grade of C in CIS 106]

    Emphasizes object-oriented design, data abstraction and programming beyond an introductory level. Introduces user interfaces and graphics through the study of object design.

    Emphasizes object-oriented software engineering including Unified Modeling Language (UML).

    Investigates fundamental sorting and searching algorithms, introductory dynamic data structures and event-driven programming techniques.

    Develops programming skills using a language that supports the object-oriented paradigm.

    CIS 202-Computer Science II (4) Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in CIS 201 Emphasizes algorithms, data structures, and

    object-oriented software engineering. Introduces

    algorithmic analysis including asymptotic notation, empirical performance measurements, and time/ space tradeoffs. Covers fundamental computing algorithms including sorting, searching, and manipulating dynamic data structures, such as lists, stacks, queues, trees, graphs and hash tables. Investigates recursion including applications to algorithms and data structures. Integrates further software engineering concepts including data

    abstraction and participation in team programming projects. Projects will be completed using a language that supports the object-oriented paradigm (Java).

    CIS 203-Systems Analysis & Design (3)

    Prerequisite: CIS 106

    Presents concepts of structured systems analysis and design techniques such as problem definition, cost analysis, charting and scheduling, implementation planning and documentation. Emphasizes project management, communication and analytical skills.

    CIS 204-Computer & Information Sciences Project (3)

    Prerequisite: CIS 203

    Student is assigned a project commensurate with their background and training and carries it through from system analysis and design to program preparation and implementation.

    CIS 208-C++ Programming (3)

    Prerequisite: CIS 106

    Emphasizes object-oriented programming in C++. This course provides a comprehensive coverage of C++ features, including arrays, strings, pointers, references, classes, inheritance, polymorphism, function overloading, function

    overriding, virtual function, and template. Students learn to design and implement object-oriented programs in C++ programming language.

    CIS 210-Data Communications and Networking (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 101 or CIS 106 or CIS 111M or CIS 116F

    Introduces Local Area Network (LAN) design and management. Emphasizes practical design considerations and hands-on management. Specific design topics include standards, topologies, interconnectivity, comparative implementations, security and electronic messaging. Management topics include installation, resource and user management and software/programming considerations.

    CIS 212-PC Repair & Diagnostics (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 101, CIS 106, CIS 116D, or CIS 111M

    Introduces diagnosis and troubleshooting of personal computers. This course covers the hardware and software troubleshooting

    techniques, including diagnosis software, board replacement, storage, and memory troubleshooting.

    Completion of this course will prepare students for the A+ certification exam. It is recommended that students take this course and CIS 111M-PC Operating Systems in the same semester.

    CIS 217-Cybercrime and Digital Forensics Investigation (3) Prerequisite: CIS 111L or CIS 111M

    Introduces the fundamentals of computer forensics including the techniques and processes involved

    in identifying, collecting, preserving, and analyzing digital evidence. Surveys the contemporary

    crime and related legal issues and laws.

    CIS 218-Information Security & Assurance (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 106

    Introduces the fundamentals of information security and assurance. Topics include cryptography, security architecture and controls, risk management and governance, disaster recovery planning and management, as well

    as security frameworks, standards, and policies. Students learn to protect information systems from unauthorized access in order to ensure confidentiality, integrity, and availability.

    CIS 219-Ethical Hacking and Systems Defense (3)

    Prerequisite: CIS 106

    Introduces the fundamentals of protecting information technology resources from cyber attacks. Students learn the tools and penetration testing methodologies used by ethical hackers, as well as the methods and tools to protect against attacks and vulnerabilities. Surveys computer crime-related laws and regulations.

    CIS 222-Computer Organization (4)

    Prerequisite: CIS 106

    Introduces the organization and essential functions of computer systems. This course surveys the components of computer systems from the architecture point of view and provides an

    in-depth discussion on topics including central processor until (CPU) structure, instruction sets, data representation, computer arithmetic, digital

    logic, memory architectures, and parallel processing. Students will also explore the support of operating systems from programming perspectives.

    CIS 223-Cloud Security (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 180 or CIS 190 Introduces the essentials of the cloud security technologies, mechanisms, and standards/

    frameworks as outlined by Cloud Security Alliance

    (CSA) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Cloud Computing Security Standards. Surveys cloud governance, certification compliance, and accreditation. Students learn to analyze risk in cloud environments and cloud security solutions, create and secure public and private

    cloud instances, and secure cloud applications.

    CIS 224-Wireless Communications (3) Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 180 or CIS 190 or CIS 210 Provides comprehensive coverage of wireless communication technology. Surveys characteristics,

    infrastructures, transmission methods, standards, and protocols of wireless communication systems. Topics include frequency spectrum, wireless network technology, cellular wireless networks, mobile applications, and mobile Internet protocol (MIP).

    CIS 225A-Computer Programming Language: PHP (3)

    Prerequisite: CIS 106

    Introduces programming using PHP.

    CIS 225B-Computer Programming Language: eXtensible Markup Language (XML) (3) Prerequisite: CIS 106

    Introduces programming using XML.

    CIS 225C-Computer Programming Language: Mobile Applet Programming (3) Prerequisite: CIS 106

    Introduces applet programming for mobile devices using the Android operating system.

    CIS 225D-Computer Programming Language: HTML5 & CSS3 (3) Prerequisite: CIS 106

    Surveys the latest Web Design and Development skills with a focus on HTML5 and CSS3. Students will learn a variety of tools including Open Source editing tools as well as Dreamweaver and some editing software. It is recommended that students have a foundational knowledge of HTML. Emphasis is placed on designing cross-browser compatible interfaces that optimize usability, accessibility,

    and enhance browser interoperability.

    CIS 226-Game Scripting (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 106

    Introduces the development of computer games using a scripting language. A current scripting language will be covered and used to develop game programs. Students learn to design and develop cross-platform computer games.

    CIS 227-Game Programming (4)

    Prerequisite: CIS 106

    Covers the development of computer games using a high-level programming language.

    Introduces the game development aspects and techniques through creation of computer programs.

    Surveys the current game engines. Students learn to develop computer game programs for specific game engines and platforms.

    CIS 228-Simulation and Game Development (4)

    Prerequisite: CIS 106

    Covers the development of digital interactive contents used in computer games and computerized simulations. This course introduces students

    to the current game engines and simulation software used to build comprehensive and interactive computer games and simulations.

    CIS 230-Database Management Systems (3)

    Prerequisite: CIS 106

    Provides an in-depth study of database management systems and the fundamentals of database design and development. Topics include Structure Query Language (SQL), normalization, integrity constraints, data models, and transaction control. Students design and develop databases and database applications utilizing database management systems (DBMS), such as Oracle or Microsoft SQL Server.

    CIS 256-Statistical Computing (3)

    Prerequisite: CIS 106

    Covers the R programming language and software development environment for statistical computing. Students learn to develop, test, and run programs in R. Students use R system as a data science tool to process data, manipulate data, and create data science results.

    CIS 257-Data Visualization (3)

    Prerequisite: CIS 106

    Covers the fundamentals and techniques of data visualization. Students learn to effectively

    communicate data by using data as a pivotal point in the presentation. Students obtain data visualization skills via hands-on activities using data analysis

    and visualization software tools, such as Tableau.

    CIS 258-Data Wrangling (3)

    Prerequisite: CIS 106

    Surveys the concepts, needs, principles, and techniques of data wrangling. Explores data extraction, transformation, and loading (ETL) tools/systems. Students practice data wrangling activities including data extraction, data transformation, data loading, integrating data sources, and correcting erroneous/missing values by utilizing computer based tools.

    CIS 259-Big Data Analytics (3)

    Prerequisite: CIS 106

    Surveys the roles, needs, challenges, principles, trends, platforms, analytic lifecycle/methods, and architectures/frameworks relevant to big data technology. Surveys big data analytics tools/ systems, such as Hadoop, MapReduce, Talend, Apache Hive, Apache Pig, SAS, or R. Students apply learned concepts and techniques to solve

    problems by using big data analytics tools/systems.

    CJ: Criminal Justice

    CJ 101-Introduction to Criminal Justice (3) Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72 Presents a history of criminal justice, with

    emphasis on English antecedents important

    to the administration of justice in the United States. Introduces the United States Constitution and Supreme Court decisions

    affecting individual rights and law enforcement practices. Includes career orientation through an analysis of criminal justice agencies.

    CJ 106-Police - Community Relations (3)

    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Police Academy

    An overview of law enforcement community relations and community policing concepts. Will review officer- citizen contacts, problem solving, crime prevention, cultural diversity, sexual harassment, and Americans with Disabilities Act. Review the prohibitions

    against racial, religious, and ethnic violence.

    CJ 108-Serial Killers: Psychosocial Perspectives (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72

    Presents an overview of serial killers in the United States and other countries. Introduces the background of serial killers as well as causes and failures in their lives that led up to the killings. Presents case studies of serial killers

    as well as the investigation, apprehension, trial, and sentencing of these offenders.

    CJ 110-Criminal Law (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Explores the history and purpose of criminal law. Also examines elements of substantive criminal common law as modified by statute. Introduces legal research and a case study review of appellate court decisions relative to selected aspects of criminal law.

    CJ 204-Police Operational Services (3)

    Prerequisites: CJ 101, CJ 110

    Examines police operational techniques and strategies, incident analysis, patrol deployment, traffic enforcement theory and practice, crime prevention and community relations and the investigative process. Explores the police officer's role as a manager of community crime prevention resources. Includes analysis of recommended practices for maintaining police officers health and safety.

    CJ 209-Criminal Investigations (3)

    Prerequisite: CJ 101 and (EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 50A or EN 61 or ESL 73)

    Introduces modern methods used in detection, investigation, and solution of crimes. Students will be taught basic investigative techniques utilized by law enforcement agencies. Analysis of actual cases will be used to demonstrate practical uses of these techniques.

    CJ 212-Criminalistics (4)

    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Police Academy Laboratory class develops skills in the identification, collection, preservation and presentation of physical

    evidence. Introduces police photography, including

    use of the camera, negative and print processing and photo preparation of courtroom presentation.

    CJ 214-The Correctional Process (3) Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99)

    OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73), and CJ 101

    Surveys the juvenile and adult correctional process from adjudication through probation or parole.

    CJ 220-Criminal Evidence & Procedure (3)

    Prerequisite: CJ 110

    Examines the United States Constitutional limitations on law enforcement, emphasizing arrest, use of force and search and seizure. Rules of evidence of particular importance to the law enforcement function including: the hearsay rule and exceptions; documentary, opinion, corpus delicti and circumstantial evidence; character and past crimes; evidentiary privileges; jurisdiction and venue; and witnesses.

    CJ 221-Police Defense Tactics (5) Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Police Academy An overview of law enforcement use of force and defensive tactic concepts. Will review

    unarmed defense, pressure points, controlled force and impact weapon usage.

    CJ 222-Police Arsenal and Procedures (5) Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Police Academy An overview of law enforcement use of force and

    firearms concepts. Review deadly force, police and

    usage, mental preparation, shooting fundamentals, safe weapons handling and firearms qualifications.

    CJ 223-Emergency Vehicle Operations Course (EVOC) (3)

    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Police Academy Presents the concepts and goals of professional driving, i.e. to reduce motor vehicle collision

    frequency by improving future law enforcement

    officer’s attitude and skills. Provides a better understanding of the capabilities and limitations of an emergency police vehicle while enhancing student’s knowledge and abilities

    as it relates to safe operation of the vehicle.

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    CMM: Communications Media

    CMM 101-Introduction to Electronic Media (3)

  • Gen Ed Arts

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR

    (ESL 72 and ESL 73) OR Corequisite: EN 75 Surveys the functions and effects of the electronic mass media. Emphasis will be placed

    on researching and analyzing the history of

    radio and television, including government regulations, audience measurement, advertising and careers in broadcasting.

    CMM 103-Introduction to Film (3)

  • Gen Ed Arts

    Presents an analytical and interpretative study of film masterworks. Covers the historical development of film from silent short movies to the present and

    includes an analysis of film from several perspectives: artistic, technological, social and economic.

    CMM 105-Basic Darkroom to Digital Photography (3)

  • Gen Ed Arts

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72 or Corequisite: EN 75

    Explores photography as a medium for artistic expression through analysis of photographic masterworks and other forms of visual art. Examines standards of professional photography and the means by which photographic works of artistic integrity are identified and comprehended. Presents basic principles of camera work in film and digital formats. Black & white and color printing techniques are also studied. For the beginning photographer.

    CMM 111-Communications Graphics I (3) Level one graphic design. Prepares the student for the print graphic design field through the use of the computer as a tool. The student will be introduced to design vocabulary, methods and

    technology through lecture, examples and hands- on project work. Emphasizes Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, and Adobe InDesign.

    CMM 112-Communications Graphics II (3)

    Prerequisite: CMM 111

    Level two graphic design. Expands on Communications Graphics I. Students will solve a variety of design problems using the computer and contemporary graphics software. Real world design assignments will be given, allowing the student to gain experience in dealing with clients, meetings, project management, cost effectiveness, and color printing prepress. Lectures, demonstrations and class critiques are held to give the student a look at the historical and functional use of design. Emphasizes intermediate design skills using Adobe InDesign, Illustrator, Acrobat, Bridge, and Photoshop.

    CMM 114-Web Design I (3)

    Prerequisite: CMM 111 or CMM 132

    Presents beginning level design for the Internet. Taught from a design perspective, students learn software, hardware, and design principles used to produce successful web sites. Assignments include the design and creation of web publications. Lectures cover the study and critique of contemporary

    web design. Primary Software: HTML, Adobe Dreamweaver, Photoshop and Imageready.

    CMM 115-Professional and Transfer Portfolio (1)

    Prerequisite: CMM 112 or CMM 212

    Designed for communications graphics students who are ready to transfer to a Bachelor's program, or are applying for an internship, or are seeking a job.

    Students will revise existing portfolios and design self- promotion materials including an effective resume and cover letter for the computer graphics profession.

    CMM 131-Darkroom Photography I (4) Provides a basic understanding of photography as technique and craftsmanship, photography in communications, as a method of expression and the scientific basis of photography. Covers the basic techniques with cameras, exposure of film,

    developing of film, printmaking, composition, light, action photography, manipulation of the image

    in the darkroom, basic chemistry of photography, sensitometry and color as it is seen. Students provide cameras and accessory equipment.

    CMM 132-Digital Photography I (3) Designed for students interested in digital photographic processes. The class will introduce basic concepts for acquiring digital images and the

    process of manipulating the image through the use of a Macintosh computer with Adobe Photoshop software. Hands-on instruction with Photoshop will include making selections, cropping images, using paint and editing tools and working with color and brush palettes. A portfolio of digital photographic work will be produced by the end of the semester.

    CMM 152-Digital Studio Production (4) Develops studio production skills pertaining to camera operation, set design, studio lighting, audio recording, and professional crew roles and

    responsibilities. Extensive hands-on active learning provides an insight into on set studio productions and real world applications. As a member of a production team, students participate in the design and execution of an effective digital studio production.

    CMM 212-Communications Graphics III (3)

    Prerequisite: CMM 112

    Level three graphic design. Offers an advanced level approach to graphic design. Expands upon Communications Graphics II. Emphasizes the development of a well-rounded graphic design portfolio, containing professional quality

    graphic design, photography and illustration. An intensive study using current graphics software to generate print graphics such as corporate identity, advertising, collateral and package designs. Primary software: Adobe InDesign, Adobe Photoshop, and Adobe Illustrator.

    CMM 214-Web Design II (3)

    Prerequisite: CMM 114

    Presents intermediate level web design. Students will design and produce multimedia web sites consisting of typography, graphics, animations, and sound. Emphasis on user interface design and web site planning through hands-on skills using HTML, BBEdit, Macromedia Dreamweaver, Macromedia Flash, Macromedia Fireworks, Adobe Photoshop, and Adobe ImageReady.

    CMM 252-Digital Film Production (4)

    Prerequisite: CMM 152

    Develops digital film production skills pertaining to preproduction, production, and post production. Extensive hands-on active learning provides an insight into script writing, budgeting, scheduling, field production, sound design, and non-linear post production. As a member of

    a production team, students will be required to create a production book, digital film, and DVD as part of their professional portfolio.

    CMM 254-Postproduction: The Art of Editing (4) Prerequisite: CMM 152 or CMM 252

    Develops practical skills in digital editing through a series of demonstrations and intensive hands-on exercises. Students will study various editing styles and philosophies while designing and completing assigned editing projects

    using professional postproduction software. Effective electronic media management and postproduction processes are emphasized.

    CMM 256-Television Studio Directing and Operations (4) Prerequisite: CMM 152

    Develops managerial and technical skills of directing television productions in a multi-camera studio. Script formats, scene blocking, managing cast and crew and technical aspects required to create successful programming are emphasized in a series of hands-on production sessions.

    CMM 259-Television News Production (4)

    Prerequisite: CMM 252

    Develops television news writing and production skills with hands-on studio and field exercises.

    Students will write news stories, interview campus and community newsmakers on-camera and

    edit news segments into finished programs on Final cut Pro. Brief lectures, demonstrations and video examples are followed by news production work. Students will learn to use professional equipment and processes while producing

    news, sports and event programming.

    CMM 261-Advanced Postproduction & Motion Graphics (4)

    Prerequisite: CMM 254

    Develops advanced skills in digital postproduction and motion graphics through a series of demonstrations and intensive hands-on

    exercises. By studying various editing styles and philosophies, students will design and complete assigned postproduction projects using professional software packages.

    CMSP: Communications Speech

    CMSP 101-Introduction to Communication Studies (3)

  • Gen Ed Communications

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR

    (ESL 72 and ESL 73) OR Corequisite: EN 75

    Introduces students to the basic theories and practical applications of human communication as it relates

    to their communication experiences. These include interpersonal situations, intercultural experiences, small group interactions, and public communication.

    Students will be given opportunities to develop their effectiveness in the speaking-listening

    communicative setting as well as develop knowledge of the communication process as a system.

    CMSP 103-Speech Fundamentals (3)

  • Gen Ed Communications

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72 or Corequisite: EN 75

    Emphasizes the attainment of understanding and skill in public speaking. Assignments require analyzing the audience, researching, organizing, outlining, supporting and delivering a variety of extemporaneous speeches.

    CMSP 105-Small Group Communication (3)

  • Gen Ed Communications; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72 or Corequisite: EN 75

    Offers skills development in verbal, non-verbal and intercultural communication, listening, observation, leadership, and participation in groups. Emphasizes collaborative learning through researching and analyzing questions of fact and policy, problem solving and decision making, interacting and reaching consensus.

    CMSP 107-Career Communication (3)

  • Gen Ed Communications

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 50A or EN 61 or ESL 95 or ESL 73 or Corequisite: EN 75

    Offers students knowledge and skills needed to communicate within their prospective professions and with others outside those professions. Assignments in interview, group discussion and extemporaneous speaking are adapted to individual students.

    CMSP 109-Basic Conflict Mediation (3)

  • Gen Ed Communications

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Presents the 7-Step Model of mediation, which includes strategic listening, handling power imbalances, and dealing with intense

    emotions. Students will engage in role plays and simulations for hands-on experience. Students will also conduct critical analyses of varying conflict resolution theories and mediation styles through discussion and written reflections.

    CMSP 201-Foundations of Communication Theory (3)

    Prerequisite: CMSP 101

    Provides students with an understanding of the principle theories related to the field of communication. Specifically, it introduces students to the study of communication theory and provides them with the conceptual and theoretical foundation needed to succeed as a communication scholar. Concepts and theories

    learned in this course will be studied in greater detail in the upper level courses required of the major.

    CON: Construction Management

    CON 101-Construction Management (3) Prerequisite or Corequisite: (EN 52 and EN 61) or EN 70 or EN 75 or ESL 99 or (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces the construction management process, each party’s roles and responsibilities, forms of construction management delivery systems, and construction documents. Students will describe the role of the construction manager within

    the context of ensuring timely, high quality, profitable, and safe construction projects.

    CON 132-Materials & Methods of Construction (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: (EN 52 and EN 61) or EN 70 or EN 75 or ESL 99 or (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Provides the construction manager with a fundamental understanding of materials and methods of construction. Emphasizes properties of materials, engineering methods, construction methods, testing methods, and related building codes. This course focuses on soil, earthwork, foundations, paving, concrete, masonry, thermal products, roofing, wood construction, steel construction, exterior and interior finishes, glazing, windows, doors, exterior wall systems, cladding,

    interior walls/partitions, finish ceilings, and flooring.

    CON 140-Architectural Blueprint Reading (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: (EN 52 and EN 61) or EN 70 or EN 75 or ESL 99 or (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces basic blueprint and construction document reading methodology. Develops the practice of utilizing construction documents as an important communication tool in the construction process. Areas of focus include views, symbols, scales, dimensions, materials, construction methods, and terminology used in the various disciplines included in construction documents.

    CON 203-Site Management (3)

    Prerequisites or Corequisites: CON 101 and CON 132 Examines the principles that apply to planning and managing construction project field

    operations. Major areas of focus include

    documentation and recordkeeping, jobsite layout and control, project safety, jobsite labor relations, subcontracting and purchasing, time and cost control, changes and claims, quality management, payments, and project closeout.

    CON 204-Construction Project Cost Estimating (3)

    Prerequisite: (CON 101 or CAD 101) and (MA 80 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test) Introduces cost estimating concepts and

    methodologies that apply to the construction

    industry. Areas of emphasis include estimating techniques, quantity take-off, pricing, material and labor estimation, estimating by division, bidding, and computer applications.

    CON 206-Construction Project Scheduling (3)

    Prerequisites: CON 101 and CON 140

    Introduces the concepts and procedures in preparing a project schedule. Bar charts, critical path method, and computer applications are examined. Students will use sample projects and case studies to apply scheduling concepts.

    EC: Economics

    EC 201-Principles of Economics (3)

  • Gen Ed Economics

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72

    Introduces basic concepts, the national accounts, national income analysis, business cycles and the monetary system with an essentially macro-economic approach.

    EC 202-Principles of Economics (3)

  • Gen Ed Economics

    Prerequisite: EC 201

    Emphasizes price theory, distribution, international trade and economic development with an essentially micro-economic approach.

    ECD: Early Childhood Development

    ECD 101-Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Examines conceptual framework for understanding the role of the early childhood education professional.

    Content focuses on the profession of early childhood education in the context of historical, philosophical, and social influences. Units of study also review contemporary trends, issues and practices in the field of early childhood education.

    ECD 104-Activities I for Children (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72; Corequisite: ED 100

    Designed to teach the methods and proper use of materials in presenting creative learning experiences to young children in the areas

    of language, creative dramatics, art, music, movement, math, science, emergent literacy, and outdoor activities. This course meets the state requirements for Office of Child Care Licensing

    & Credentialing. This course is 45 hours of the 90 hours required for Preschool Lead Teacher. Fifteen hours of documented observation are required.

    ECD 106-Infants & Toddlers Development and Care (3) Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72 or Corequisite: EN 75

    Examines the best practices designed to meet the needs of infants and toddlers as related to their physical growth and development, mental health, and human relationships. Attention will be given to the family and child’s multicultural customs, gender equity, and children with special needs, while insuring quality program development and implementation in out of home care environments. Content will focus on the caregiver, the child, and the program being provided to meet the learning

    needs of the infant and toddler. This course meets the state requirements of Office of Child Care Licensing and Credentialing for Infant/Toddler Lead Teacher.

    ECD 107-Child Health, Safety and Nutrition (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72 or Corequisite: EN 75

    Presents a survey of the health, safety and nutritional needs of young children. Includes required state and federal codes. Emphasizes the establishment and maintenance of a safe and healthy learning environment.

    ECD 108-Activities for the School-Age Child (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72 or Corequisite: EN 75

    Examines developmentally appropriate principles, materials, and methods used with school age children ages 6 to 12. Specific consideration given to planning activities for school age child care. Students plan and present lessons in the areas of physical, cognitive, and social development. This course meets the state requirements of Office of Child Care Licensing and Credentialing for School Age Teacher.

    ECD 210-Directed Practicum in Early Childhood (3)

    Prerequisites: Successful completion (grade of C or higher) of ED 100, ED 203 or ECD 110, ECD 101, ECD 104, ECD 106 and ECD 213

    Offers students an opportunity to conduct structured observation and participate in activities in an early childhood setting. Students will provide assistance to the classroom instructor and may

    be required to assume major responsibility for the full range of teaching and care giving duties for

    a group of young children. In addition, students will complete a course portfolio. Students will participate in 60 hours of directed practicum

    at an assigned site (4 hours per week).

    ECD 212-Administration of Child Development Centers (3)

    Prerequisites: ED 100 and (ECD 104 or ECD 108) Designed to provide students with management skills necessary to operate an early childhood center,

    family child care or before/after school program that

    serves children from infancy through age twelve. Topics include program policies and procedures, government regulations, finance and budget, facility operation, personnel management, health and safety, accreditation systems, and program evaluation and improvement. This course meets the state requirements of Office of Child Care licensing and credentialing for School Age and Preschool Director.

    ECD 213-Understanding and Guiding the Young Child’s Behavior (3) Prerequisite: ED 100

    Designed for adults who are responsible for the care and development of young children from birth to eight years of age, primarily in an early childhood setting. This course will focus

    on developmentally appropriate child guidance philosophies, methodologies of discipline,

    and guidelines for the responsible adult.

    ECD 230-Language & Literacy Development in Early Childhood (3) Prerequisites: ED 100, ECD 104

    Designed for adults who are responsible for the care, development and teaching of young children from birth to eight years in primarily an early childhood setting. This course is a study of the development of oral language by the young child, the relationship between language development and emerging literacy, and the structuring of the learning environment for the child birth to eight years. A variety of quality early childhood literature will be reviewed along with methods for using children's literature to enhance language development.

    ED: Education

    ED 100-Child Development & Behavior (3) Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72 Introduces basic growth and developmental principles necessary to work with young children

    from birth to twelve years old. Emphasizes the social, emotional, physical, and cognitive developmental stages of the young child. This course meets the Maryland State Department Office of Child Care Licensing & Credentialing

    requirements. This course is 45 hours of the 90 hours required for Preschool Lead Teacher.

    ED 102-Schools and Society (3)

  • Gen Ed Education

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    It is strongly recommended that students pass this course prior to ED 202 and ED 203, if applicable. Examines the historical, philosophical, and social

    development of American education. Students

    will learn methods, concepts, and principles of education. They analyze and reflect on the

    processes of teaching and learning. They explore the interrelationships of education, social institutions, and pluralistic culture. Students will also reflect on ways that values, skills, and experience shape and are shaped by schooling and society. Observations, teaching, and a portfolio are required. Fifteen

    hours of documented observation are required.

    ED 202-Educational Psychology (3) Prerequisites: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 50A or EN 61 or ESL 95 or ESL 73, and PS 101. It is strongly recommended that students pass ED 102, if applicable, prior to taking this course.

    Introduces the nature and theories of learning processes.

    Focuses on classroom interaction and its influence upon the learning process and the growth and development of the child. (This course satisfies the Maryland State Department of Education professional education course work in human learning.) Fifteen hours of documented observation are required.

    ED 203-Foundations of Special Education (3)

  • Cultural Competence

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    It is strongly recommended that students pass ED 102 or ECD 101, if applicable, prior to taking this course. Provides an overview of critical issues and strategies

    related to educating students who have been

    identified as exceptional. The course content focuses on historical and legal foundations of special education, inclusive education, developmental characteristics of exceptional students, and strategies for accommodating students. (This

    course satisfies the Maryland State Department of Education professional education course work in inclusion of special populations.) Fifteen hours of documented observation are required.

    ED 214-Processes and Acquisition of Reading (3) Prerequisites: 30 credits including EN 101, PS 101 or teacher certification

    Assists pre-service and in-service teachers in understanding the reading acquisition process through observation and analysis of reading and written language development and the study of current issues in reading research. The course is organized around current, accepted, research-based theoretical models that account for individual differences in reading. The course includes an introduction to language structures, including spoken syllables, phonemes, graphemes, and morphemes. Participants will apply knowledge of the core areas of language to reading acquisition

    in terms of first and second language acquisition, typical development, and exceptionalities.

    Participants will be introduced to current scientific research related to literacy acquisition.

    ED 215-Instruction of Reading (3)

    Prerequisite: ED 214

    Facilitates understanding and use of a representative array of research-based instructional techniques

    and strategies in the area of reading. The course emphasizes instructional routines and strategies in the five major components of reading instruction (phonological and phonemic awareness; phonics, spelling and word study; fluency; vocabulary development; and comprehension) suitable

    for various age and ability groups. Throughout the course, students will demonstrate their skill with instructional routines and strategies through role-play, live demonstrations, and critique of models, and review the research evidence relevant to those approaches.

    ED 216-Materials for Teaching Reading (3)

    Prerequisite: ED 214

    Assists pre-service and in-service teachers in understanding and using the findings of scientific research to select, evaluate, and compare instructional programs and materials for teaching reading. Participants will learn strategies for enabling students to become strategic, fluent, and independent readers using a variety of

    texts and other materials. They will develop techniques to involve parents, school staff, and members of the community in children’s reading development and enjoyment.

    ED 217-Assessment for Reading Instruction (3)

    Prerequisites: ED 214, ED 215

    Assists pre-service and in-service teachers in becoming proficient consumers and users of classroom-based assessments and assessment data. Instruction focuses on the purposes of assessment, types of assessment tools, administration and use of several valid, reliable, well-researched formal

    and informal assessments of reading and related skills, effective interpretation of assessments results, and communication of assessments results in a variety of contexts. Participants

    will show that they can use assessment data to guide instructional decisions. Participants will demonstrate their abilities by selecting,

    administering, and/or interpreting assessments appropriate for screening, diagnosis, monitoring of progress, and measurement of outcomes.

    ED 218-Teaching Reading in the Content Areas, Part I (3) Prerequisites: 30 credits including EN 101, PS 101 or teacher certification

    Provides students with an understanding of the essentials of reading processes necessary for secondary students to become proficient readers. Participants gain an understanding of the following five areas: purposes and types of

    reading, methods of assessing reading, strategies and skills in reading, student-centered reading instruction, and affective dimensions of reading. (This course can be used to partially satisfy

    the Maryland State Department of Education reading requirement for secondary teachers.)

    ED 219-Teaching Reading in the Content Areas, Part II (3) Prerequisite: ED 218

    Expands on Part I, focusing on types of reading, skills in reading, and instruction. The emphasis will be on teaching secondary student to learn from text. Participants will formulate research questions, complete a literature review, and implement and evaluate a coherent literacy plan. Participants will also implement reading and writing strategies that promote student mastery of subject content. (This course can be used to partially satisfy

    the Maryland State Department of Education reading requirement for secondary teachers.)

    ED/PS 208-Human Growth and Development (3)

  • Gen Ed Education

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Presents central concepts related to parameters of human development through the life span. Includes physical, social, emotional and mental development at the various stages of life. Considers the influence of culture as well as individual differences.

    EG: Engineering

    EG 100-Introductory Engineering Science (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) or [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99)

    OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73), and MA 111

    Develops basic concepts of engineering approaches to problem solving and the skills for the design

    and timely fabrication of the designed product.

    EG 110-Engineering Statics (3)

    Prerequisite: MA 210

    Investigates that branch of physical science called mechanics. Mechanics deals with the state of rest or motion of bodies that are subjected to the action of forces. Statics is one branch of mechanics that deals with the equilibrium of bodies, i.e., those that are at rest or that move with a constant velocity.

    Includes theory and applications with an emphasis on developing ability to analyze problems.

    EG 210-Mechanics of Materials (3)

    Prerequisites: MA 211, PY 203

    Includes analysis of systems of forces on a deformable body. Tools covered include geometrical relationships, free body diagrams, equilibrium equations and

    stress and strain properties of materials. Concepts are applied to beams, columns, shafts and

    covers other machine and structural parts.

    EG 211-Engineering Dynamics (3)

    Corequisite: MA 212

    Includes the study of the motion of bodies relative to each other in two dimensions and in three dimensions. Analyzes systems both at rest and in motion. Includes force acceleration, work energy and impulse-momentum relationships.

    EG 214-Engineering Thermodynamics (3) Prerequisites: CH 102, EG 211, MA 212, PY 204 Examines basic thermodynamic principles including energy, entropy and free energy, and

    describes the macroscopic properties of various systems such as equilibrium states and phase transitions. Emphasizes applications to metals, polymers, ceramics and electronic materials.

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    EM: Emergency Management

    EM 101-Disaster, Crisis, and Emergency Management (3)

  • Gen Ed Emerging Issues

    Prerequisite: EN 70 OR Prerequisites or Corequisites:

    EN 75 OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces students to the dynamic and relevant world of disaster, crisis, and emergency management. Conducts a review of the history, social, political,

    and economic implications of disasters, giving students the opportunity to explore the world of Emergency Management and experience the satisfaction of serving, survivability, and the

    heartache of devastation. Provides experience with effective writing, critical thinking, and historical and social awareness as students examine the emergencies of past, present, and future.

    EM 104-Disaster Response and Recovery (3) Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Provides students with an understanding of disaster response and recovery operations in emergency management. Students will examine the nature of emergencies and disasters, identify the human responses in the disaster process, assess current procedures for response operations, and review recovery policies, programs, and methods to promote the return to normalcy.

    EM 106-Hazard, Risk, and Mitigation (3) Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Provides the student with a thorough understanding of mitigation for disaster management, and the application of hazard management. The student will investigate various methods of risk management, risk reduction, risk avoidance, risk acceptance, and risk transfer to address both structural and non- structural mitigation. The concept of sustainability and its role in local land-use planning is examined.

    EM 110-Federal Emergency Management (3) Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Provides the student with the understanding of the role of the federal government in emergency

    management on the national level, and the influence of the federal government on local, regional,

    state, and international emergency management. Explores the historical development of the federal emergency management effort with emphasis on significant events that shaped existing policy.

    EM 111-Preparing and Securing the Homeland (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Provides students with a thorough understanding of the strategic, political, legal, and organizational challenges associated with the protection of the

    U.S. homeland. Examines the range of potential threats to the U.S. homeland, including the historical foundation of terrorism. Introduces the role of emergency management in the response to the growing threat of domestic and international terrorism. Focuses on the implications of homeland security challenges and policies for constitutional rights, legal protections, and civil liberties.

    EM 115-Foundations of Emergency Management (0)

    Prerequisites: FEM 131, FEM 151, FEM 205 Provides an introduction to the position of emergency manager, including history, key

    areas of emphasis, and responsibilities. Surveys

    emergency management as an integrated system with resources and capabilities networked together to address all hazards. Introduces the National Incident Management System (NIMS), the Incident Command System (ICS), and Emergency Operations Center (EOC) operations.

    EM 125-Emergency Management Coordination (0)

    Prerequisites: FEM 150, FEM 161, FEM 215

    Provides an introduction to the fundamentals of emergency management coordination. Surveys how the resources and capabilities of organizations at

    all levels can be networked together in emergency management phases for effective all-hazard response. Introduces the National Incident Management System, the Incident Command System, and Emergency Operations Center operations.

    EM 130-Integrated Emergency Management (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: EM 101 or ID 225 or FSA 107 Provides students with an understanding of the concept of Integrated Emergency Response to

    disasters and other critical incidents. Students

    examine the role of Integrated Emergency Preparedness in the government environment, and expand the understanding to public-private cooperation in emergency management.

    EM 135-Leadership and Management (0)

    Prerequisites: FEM 132, FEM 133, FEM 134

    Introduces students to the impact of leadership and influence in emergency management. Describes decision-making and the attributes of an effective decision maker. Explains how leaders are able to build trust and motivate others to achieve shared goals. Identifies basic communication skills needed to convey decisions across a diverse workforce in

    a timely, inclusive, and motivational manner.

    EM 165-Animals in Disasters (0)

    Prerequisites: FEM 131, FEM 205, FEM 109, FEM 110,

    FEM 138, FEM 215

    Provides the basic background knowledge necessary for developing a coordinated response to disasters in which animals, livestock, agriculture assets, and their owners are affected. Introduces specific challenges posed by animals, livestock, and agricultural assets during disaster situations, and provides training on appropriate options for responding to and planning for them. Heightens awareness of the special issues that emergency managers and planners need to consider when incorporating animal-care annexes into their

    emergency operation, mitigation, and recovery plans.

    EM 167-State and Local Emergency Management (0)

    Prerequisites: FEM 131, FEM 205, FEM 103, FEM 119,

    FEM 161, FEM 215

    Introduces the various disaster assistance processes and programs available at the state and local level of government and orients students to their purposes and interactions. Surveys the history, roles, and services of disaster relief voluntary agencies and the role, design, and functions of Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs) and their relationships as components of a multi-agency coordination system. Details exercise evaluation concepts and familiarizes students with the exercise improvement planning process

    and its relevant documentation and regulations.

    EM 169-Continuity of Operations Planning (COOP) (0)

    Prerequisites: FEM 131, FEM 205, FEM 103, FEM 150,

    FEM 173, FEM 176

    Provides an overview of the concept of continuity planning including the legal basis, the Continuity Program Management Cycle, and essential elements of a viable continuity program.

    Explores the requirements for developing a continuity program as prescribed in Federal Continuity Directive (FCD) 1. Explains the interdependencies of the Incident Command System and exercise design to the COOP planning process, and provides experience developing

    and implementing exercise/training programs.

    EM 171-Mitigation (0)

    Prerequisites: FEM 131, FEM 205, FEM 104, FEM 157,

    FEM 186, FEM 187

    Introduces the concepts, terminology, and considerations involved in hazard mitigation, community sustainability, and resiliency. Investigates risk management principles, means of implementing and assessing them (e.g. Hazard Mitigation Plans and sustainable construction practices), and

    their cost and damage reduction effects. Orients students to basic mechanics, risks, potential partners, and mitigation options for a variety of common natural and human-caused disaster events. Prepares students to communicate preparedness, prevention, and other mitigation approaches to

    the broader public as means of both disaster effect reduction and personal safety improvement.

    EM 173-Incident Management for Schools (0)

    Prerequisites: FEM 131, FEM 205, FEM 103, FEM 127,

    FEM 150, FEM 156

    Details the Incident Command System (ICS) principles and organization and operational tactics driven by the complexities of an incident or event. Investigates the applicability of those ICS principles to school- based, complex incidents, or incidents otherwise

    in possession of multiple hazard facets. Surveys human-driven and naturally occurring hazards that threaten communities as well as methods to improve preparedness and safety therefrom.

    Introduces the school Emergency Operations Plan (EOP), its development, and trains students in development of plans and exercises for contribution to and maintenance of such a school EOP.

    EM 175-Emergency Management Professional Development (0)

    Prerequisites: FEM 131, FEM 205, FEM 103, FEM 132,

    FEM 133, FEM 134, FEM 135, FEM 140

    Provides a comprehensive set of fundamentals for those in the emergency management profession. Explores the tools and skills necessary for effective planning and exercise design in the emergency management field. Introduces basic leadership skills and communication techniques and instructs regarding their extension and application to the management of volunteers in disaster readiness/ response scenarios and personnel in general.

    Emphasizes the connections between each extended field and the basic theory and principles of the emergency management cycle and provides opportunities for analysis and reflection on the connections as they are discovered.

    EM 177-Emergency Management Education Planner (0)

    Prerequisites: FEM 131, FEM 205, FEM 103, FEM 140,

    FEM 150, FEM 156, FEM 196

    Introduces core concepts in disaster planning specifically adapted to primary, secondary, or post-secondary educational institutions. Explores the response and recovery resources available and responsibilities inherent to planners in such institutions. Develops skills necessary for the development of school Emergency Operations Plans (EOPs) and the completion of preparedness tasks for the maintenance and improvement thereof. Investigates the connections between planning for school readiness and preparing for, responding to, and recovering from mass casualty incidents, as well as what to do when a mass casualty incident and a school location overlap.

    EM 179-Public Information Officer (0)

    Prerequisites: FEM 131, FEM 205, FEM 134, FEM 151,

    FEM 171, FEM 202

    Instructs regarding the role and responsibilities of the Public Information Officer (PIO) and explores the PIO’s function in and typical interactions with the public safety/emergency management environment. Surveys the Joint Information System (JIS) and the Joint Information Center (JIC) and examines their

    relations and interactions in theory as well as practical response application. Introduces National Incident Management System (NIMS), its core components, and investigates its uses in conveying appropriate situational awareness information to the public before, during, and following a disaster event.

    EM 181-Community Preparedness Planner (0)

    Prerequisites: FEM 131, FEM 205, FEM 140, FEM 180,

    FEM 181, FEM 221

    Trains students in the fundamentals of the emergency planning process including the rationale behind planning as a part of a holistic approach using the emergency preparedness cycle. Develops a student’s capability for effective participation in the all-hazard emergency operations planning process.

    Introduces the importance of including people with disabilities, access, and/or functional needs in planning and response, and explores means by

    which their needs or abilities may be most effectively addressed and incorporated in the planning process.

    EM 183-Critical Infrastructure Strategist (0)

    Prerequisites: FEM 131, FEM 205, FEM 181, FEM 188,

    FEM 194, FEM 195

    Provides training regarding critical infrastructure duties and responsibilities at the state, local, tribal, and territorial levels. Describes strategies for taking action against insider threats to critical infrastructure and explores real-world best practices for the same. Explains duties and responsibilities for securing a critical infrastructure. Introduces the concept of resilience, discusses its beneficial effects on the security and preparedness processes, and instructs on the process and necessary mindset for developing, planning for, and perpetually improving resilience generally, and for critical infrastructure in particular.

    EM 187-Disaster Construction Issues (0)

    Prerequisites: FEM 131, FEM 205, FEM 104, FEM 105,

    FEM 130, FEM 144

    Provides an introduction to the issues related to and that should be considered during construction

    following a disaster. Introduces the National Incident Management System, the Incident Command System, Executive Order 12699 - Building for Earthquakes of Tomorrow, National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) policy and regulations towards retrofitting flood-prone residential structures, and Environmental/Historical Preservation Compliance. Examines impact of construction on environment, population, and historic preservation sites prior

    to and following disaster scenarios, and offers the opportunity to analyze the difference between practical necessities and compliance requirements in response and rebuilding for recovery.

    EM 189-Radiologic/Hazardous Response (0)

    Prerequisites: FEM 131, FEM 205, FEM 102, FEM 115,

    FEM 116, FEM 146

    Provides a focused training for responding to emergencies concerning radiologically active and hazardous materials. Grounds students in a thorough knowledge of basic preparedness followed by specific emphasis on the skills

    necessary for organizing and leading radiological or otherwise hazardous response actions. Details a variety of hazardous materials likely to be

    encountered in a career in emergency management planning or response, and orients students to

    the classification systems and documentation requirements necessary for interacting with such materials on an official level in compliance with emergency management regulations.

    EM 201-Public Safety GIS and Technology (3) Prerequisite or Corequisite: EM 101 or ID 225 or FSA 107 Introduces students to the technologies, applications, and tools relevant to the current emergency

    management professional environment. Explores the impact of a rapidly improving technological environment on all phases of the emergency management process and discusses potential means of leveraging technology to improve known deficiencies. Focuses intensively on the applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology with a view to preparing students for its necessary use in emergency management

    careers. Offers experience in working with, creating, and interpreting GIS maps and other visual products.

    Discusses the future changes and challenges facing the emergency management discipline as a result of continued technological growth.

    EM 213-Social Impacts of Disaster (3) Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Provides students with an enhanced awareness of the response planning and response challenges of diverse Individuals, groups, and communities to disaster. Students will discover how disasters influence structures, interactions, and subjective

    perceptions among community members. Examines how social inequality, including race, ethnicity, class, and gender, result in enhanced vulnerabilities in disasters. Students will analyze the diverse cultural rules and biases of response organizations and communities that converge during disasters.

    EM 215-Planning and Response (0) Prerequisites: FEM 140, FEM 159, FEM 174 Introduces the concepts and core components of the emergency planning process, including

    the rationale behind planning as an emergency management process. Introduces participants to the key concepts and principles of the National Response Framework. Describes key Mission

    Assignment (MA) concepts and provides knowledge needed to carry out MA processing responsibilities.

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    EM 220-Emergency Management Planning (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: EM 130

    Provides a thorough understanding of risk management, operational planning, and strategic planning as applied in current emergency management policy. Teaches evaluation and

    use of current policy tools to determine risk vulnerabilities and capabilities, critically evaluate an emergency operations plan, identify the components of an emergency operations plan, and assess the purpose of strategic planning.

    EM 221-Public Safety Leadership and Ethics (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: EM 201 or FSA 201 Provides the student with understanding of leadership theories, skills, and techniques for

    application in emergency management. Introduces

    the concept of effective leadership in emergency management by identifying leadership models utilized in managing across the life cycle of

    the incidents. Challenges students to analyze and evaluate current emergency management leaders and their leadership styles for their theoretical value and practical effectiveness.

    EM 225-Emergency Management Mitigation (0)

    Prerequisites: FEM 157, FEM 186, FEM 173 Explores the reasons and need for planning for a sustainable, disaster-resistant community.

    Introduces participants to mitigation basics for

    both natural and human-driven disasters. Describes the Continuity Management Program, Process

    and Cycle, the fundamentals of Risk Management, and the importance of Devolution Planning.

    EM 235-Recovery and Assessment (0)

    Prerequisites: FEM 103, FEM 179, FEM 201

    Provides students with the knowledge to plan an effective damage assessment program, conduct rapid damage assessments, and begin the process of recovery and mitigation. Introduces students

    to the Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP), exercise design, and exercises as a concept. Explores the National Disaster Recovery Framework (NDRF) key concepts, core principles, and roles and responsibilities of NDRF leadership.

    EM 297-Emergency Management Capstone (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 101; Prerequisite or Corequisite: EM 220 and EM 221

    As the culminating experience for the Emergency Management Track II major, this course enables students to exercise critical thinking and evaluation skills, while applying comprehension of the emergency management discipline. Students will write a research paper, under the supervision of a faculty mentor, which demonstrates the ability to analyze and synthesize the theories and practices to reduce vulnerability to hazards and mitigate disasters.

    EN/CMM: English & Communications

    EN/CMM 241-Journalism Publication Practicum (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities; Gen Ed Communications; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Provides instruction and laboratory experience in writing, editing, designing, and publishing print and digital content for The Commuter. Students receive practical experience in journalistic and social media content, curation, editing, design, photography, and digital production using industry standard software. Students will create and produce three journalistic publications per semester.

    EN: English

    EN 70-Introduction to College Reading and Writing (0) [6] Prerequisite: Appropriate scores on the reading and writing placement tests

    Provides extended practice with academic writing based on college-level texts. The course stresses the interaction between critical reading, writing, and thinking. The course offers structured practice and support with writing academic essays, improving reading comprehension, and increasing critical reading skills to succeed in future college academic tasks. Students are guided to become flexible, confident, and independent readers and writers.

    EN 75-Reading and Writing in the Academic Disciplines (0) [4] Prerequisite: EN 51 or appropriate scores on the reading and writing placement tests

    Promotes the integrated approach to the development of active reading and writing strategies for the tasks and texts students encounter in

    college. The course stresses the interaction among the reader, the text, and the context and one’s ability to critically respond to a variety of writing situations. The course addresses whole discourse and sentence-level matters. Students are guided to become independent readers and writers.

    EN 101-English Composition (3)

  • Gen Ed English

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) OR (satisfactory performance on the writing assessment and satisfactory performance on the reading assessment)

    Develops students’ ability to use writing, reading, research, and thinking processes to create documented essays that demonstrate the conventions of academic writing.

    EN 102-English Composition and Literature (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities; Gen Ed Communications

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Reinforces, through an examination of literature, the reading, writing, critical thinking, and information literacy skills introduced in English Composition.

    By exploring literary texts from fiction, poetry, and drama, students learn to clarify their own values and identities as well as develop a better understanding of ideas and cultures beyond their own experience.

    EN 201-British Literature Anglo-Saxon Period to the Eighteenth Century (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Surveys the literature of Great Britain from the Anglo-Saxon period to the eighteenth century. The growth of a nation, social classes, the rise and questioning of the monarchy, the role of women, and early colonialism are explored through poetry, prose fiction and nonfiction, and drama.

    EN 202-British Literature Eighteenth Century through the Present (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Surveys the literature of Great Britain from the eighteenth century through the present. The rise of industry, changing views of gender and citizen, the rise and fall of an empire, world wars, and artistic experimentation are explored through the literary genres of poetry, fiction, and drama.

    EN 203-American Literature Pre- Colonial through Civil War Periods (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Surveys American literature from its pre- contact beginnings. Culture clash, settlement, rebellion, and the rise of a democratic republic are explored through histories, diaries, sermons, pamphlets, poetry, essays, and fiction.

    EN 204-American Literature Civil War Period through the Present (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Surveys American literature from the late 19th Century to today. The rise of industrialism, world wars, the fragmenting of society, and artistic experimentation are explored through the literary genres of poetry, fiction, and drama.

    EN 205-World Literature through 1650 C.E. (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Surveys selected works of western and non- western literature from their beginnings through 1650 C.E. Cultural and historical contexts are explored through a wide range of literary forms.

     

    EN 206-World Literature 1650

    C.E. through the Present (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Surveys selected works of western and non- western literature from 1650 C.E. through the present. Cultural and historical contexts are explored through a wide range of literary forms.

    EN 210-Creative Writing (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Introduces skills of writing fiction and/or poetry and/or creative nonfiction. The complexities of creative writing as a craft and an art are explored through analysis of representative works, study of techniques, and extensive practice.

    EN 210J-Creative Writing I (Poetry/Fiction Comb.) (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Introduces skills of writing narrative fiction and/ or poetry and/or drama. The complexities of creative writing as a craft and an art are explored through analysis of representative works, study of techniques and extensive practice.

    EN 212-Newswriting and Reporting (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Provides instruction and practice in news reporting and in the fundamentals of newswriting. Professional news stories in newspapers, magazines, and the Web will be analyzed and evaluated. The course

    concentrates on key rhetorical elements, organization, and structure of common news, features, and opinion articles, both in print and digital news mediums.

    EN 215-Technical Writing (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Develops the skills necessary for effective business, scientific and technical communication through situational writing. Includes work in audience analysis, letter and resume writing, informal and formal reports, graphics and presentations.

    EN 216-The Short Story (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Surveys a wide variety of short stories that explore themes relevant to life experiences. Analyzes the elements of the short story with emphasis on thematic development and relevance of the stories to life experiences in a variety of cultures and nations.

    EN 222-Creative Writing Practicum: Tuscarora Review Editorial Board (3) Prerequisite: EN 210 or permission of instructor

    Provides opportunities for students to work on the College’s magazine of the creative arts for credit by evaluating submissions of essays, short stories, poetry, drama and two-dimensional art; by copy editing the material; and by laying out the magazine. May be taken three times for a maximum of nine credits.

     

    EN 223-Classical Mythology (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Surveys Greek and Roman mythology, emphasizing the impact it has had on Western literature, art, music and human culture throughout the ages. Attention will also be paid to the sites of the ancient world that have gained special significance through these myths.

    EN 226-Film as Literature (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Surveys selected films and their counterparts in literature. Emphasizes narrative abilities of film.

    EN 227-Literature: Multicultural Perspectives (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Examines diverse experiences of the human condition through the reading of selected works from a variety of historically underrepresented groups.

    EN 230-African American Literature (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Surveys a wide variety of African American literature: fiction, drama and poetry. Analyzes the elements of each of the genres with emphasis on the literature as a response to people and events affecting African American life, culture and rights.

    EN 231-English Language Studies (3)

    Gen Ed Humanities Prerequisite: EN 101

    Introduces English language studies through a linguistics perspective, promoting a systematic approach to the study of language. Focuses on prescriptive versus descriptive approaches to grammar and syntax; sub-disciplines of linguistics: phonology, morphology, semantics, stylistics, discourse analysis, and sociolinguistics; English language variation, change, and development; and the role of English language in a multicultural society.

    EN 246-Writing for Online Media (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Introduces students to key elements of writing for Web communities. Students will learn techniques to create written content for promotional

    e-mails, website pages, social media, and blogs. Students will use multiple writing strategies, and draw from expository, creative, and journalistic modes of expression. Students will work with a client to develop a digital content strategy for promoting an idea, product, event, or service and complete several pieces of original content to start building a professional portfolio.

    course descriptions ESL: ESL (English as a Second Language)

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    ESL 70-Academic Reading I (0) [4] Prerequisite: Placement on the college’s ESL assessment (LOEP)

    Designed for students whose native language is not English, but who have a working knowledge of the English language. This course focuses on developing the strategies, vocabulary, and fluency necessary for comprehension of academic texts.

    ESL 71-Academic Grammar & Writing I (0) [4]

    Prerequisite: Placement on the college’s ESL assessment (LOEP)

    Designed for students whose native language is not English, but who have a working knowledge and understanding of the English language.

    Includes integrated instruction in grammar and writing with emphasis on developing the grammar proficiency for academic writing

    necessary for success in subsequent ESL courses.

    ESL 72-Academic Reading II (0) [4]

    Prerequisites: (ESL 70 and ESL 71) or (ESL 98 and ESL 95) or placement on the college’s ESL assessment (LOEP); Corequisite: ESL 73

    Designed for students whose native language is not English, but who have advanced knowledge of the English language. This course focuses on developing proficiency in the employment of reading strategies and usage, and comprehension

    of college-level vocabulary necessary for success in credit courses. Placement is based upon students’ performance on the college’s ESL assessment.

    ESL 73-Academic Grammar & Writing II (0) [4]

    Prerequisites: (ESL 70 and ESL 71) or (ESL 98 and ESL 95) or placement on the college’s ESL assessment (LOEP); Corequisite: ESL 72

    Designed for students whose native language is not English, but who have advanced knowledge and understanding of the English language.

    Includes integrated instruction in grammar and writing with an emphasis on developing

    grammatical variety and sophistication for academic communication as well as an introduction to integrating sources In academic essay writing.

    ESL 76-Academic Oral Communication Skills I (0) [3] Prerequisite: Placement by the college’s LOEP assessment into ESL Level I or higher

    Designed to help students practice and improve academic listening and speaking skills as needed for functioning successfully in academic and

    professional settings. There will be exercises, practice, and small and large group activities designed

    to develop the academic listening/note-taking, pronunciation, and oral presentation skills necessary for the rigor of degree programs and/or professional communication. Credits are not applicable toward graduation. Placement is based upon students’ performance on the college’s ESL assessment.

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    FEM: FEMA

    FEM 103-Community Disaster Exercise (1) Introduces the basic principles of community disaster exercises. It builds a foundation for subsequent exercise courses. Included are the management of an exercise program, designing and developing of an exercise, conducting and evaluating an exercise, and developing and implementing an improvement plan.

    FEM 104-Earthquake Structural Mitigation (1) Provides students involved in state and local governments, and the building and financial industries, with knowledge concerning the requirements of federal and federally assisted or regulated new building construction. The course

    is also intended to provide the student with basic knowledge about earthquakes and how buildings can be built to be safe during an earthquake.

    FEM 105-Retrofitting Flood-Prone Residential Structures (1)

    Provides students with the essential, nontechnical background knowledge about retrofitting. The retrofitting measures presented are creative and practical, comply with applicable floodplain regulations, and are satisfactory to homeowners.

    FEM 107-Hazardous Materials for Medical Personnel (1)

    Designed to prepare hospital personnel to analyze hazardous materials situations, take the necessary steps to assure medical providers safety, and identify appropriate resources for decontamination and medical care. Additional training is required

    in order to diagnose and treat patients who have been involved in hazardous materials incidents.

    FEM 109-Introduction to Animals in Disaster (1)

    Intended to increase awareness and preparedness among animal owners and care providers. It includes sections on typical hazards, how these affect animals and what can be done by responsible owners to reduce the impact of disasters. It is also intended to help animal owners, care providers and industries

    to better understand emergency management. Course material will heighten awareness of the special issues that emergency managers need to consider when incorporating animal-care annexes into their emergency operations plans.

    FEM 110-Animals in Disaster Planning (1) Intended to guide emergency management officials and animal owners, care providers, and industries

    in preparing community disaster plans. The goal is to provide sufficient information for both groups to meet and develop meaningful and effective plans that improve the care of animals, their owners,

    and the animal-care industries in disasters. This course provides the basic background knowledge needed to develop a coordinated response to

    a disaster in which animals and their owners are affected. Further training with local or state emergency management programs is essential.

    FEM 115-Introduction to Radiological Emergency Management (1)

    Provides students with the background and practical knowledge necessary to understand the fundamental concepts of radioactivity, the types of radiological emergencies, and the potential effects of these incidents upon the emergency responder as well as the general public. Included are the measures that need to be enacted to ensure safety for all affected.

    FEM 116-Introduction to Hazardous Materials (1)

    Intended to provide a general introduction to hazardous materials that can serve as a foundation for more specific studies in the future. The course has five units. No prior knowledge of the subject is required.

    FEM 119-Volunteer Agencies in Emergency Management (1)

    Provides students with a basic understanding of the history, roles, and services of disaster relief voluntary agencies in providing disaster assistance. It is appropriate for both the general public and those involved in emergency management operations.

    FEM 122-Community Hurricane Preparedness (1)

    Provides emergency managers and disaster coordinators with basic information about the nature of hurricanes and the hazards they pose, and how the National Weather Service (NWS) forecasts future hurricane behavior.

    FEM 127-Emergency Management of Hazardous Weather (1)

    Designed to provide the student with a solid background in understanding hazardous weather and community risks so they can communicate effectively with the local National Weather Service office and their community.

    FEM 130-Introduction to Residential Coastal Construction (1)

    Provides the student with a guideline of basic information concerning residential coastal construction. It identifies the best practices for improving the quality of construction and reducing the economic losses associated with coastal disasters. It also explains how the risk to coastal residential development can be reduced by employing best practices in site location, design, and construction.

    FEM 131-Principles of Emergency Management (1)

    Provides an introduction to the fundamentals of emergency management as an integrated system. Surveys how the resources and capabilities of organizations at all levels can be

    networked together in emergency management phases for effective hazard response.

    FEM 132-Introduction to Leadership and Influence (1)

    Provides an introduction to leadership and influence skills by addressing the following topics: leadership from within, how to facilitate

    change, how to build and rebuild trust, how to use personal and political influence, and how to foster an environment for leadership development.

    FEM 133-Decision Making and Problem Solving (1)

    Provides students with decision making and problem solving strategies and best practices that are vital requirements of the emergency

    manager, planner, and responder position. Explores a five-step problem-solving model. Examines effective methods for guiding group decision making during complex or significant events.

    FEM 134-Effective Communication (1) Provides an introduction to communication and interpersonal skills needed by local

    emergency managers, planners, and responders. Develops communication skills needed in emergency management situations.

    FEM 135-Developing and Managing Volunteers (1)

    Provides an introduction for working with volunteers and volunteer agencies (VOLAG) on emergency management projects. The need to work with volunteers before, during, and after emergency situations will be stressed.

    FEM 136-Debris Operations (1)

    Provides an introduction to the fundamentals of Debris Operations in an emergency management environment. Defines and describes the functions of individuals and organizations in debris operations. Identifies and discusses critical debris operations issues. Surveys funding, eligibility, and contracting issues related to debris operations.

    FEM 138-Livestock in Disasters (1)

    Provides an introduction to the issues farmers and emergency managers must deal with during an emergency management environment. Examines approaches that will mitigate the impact of disasters on livestock. Discusses emergency planning for farming communities. Defines different types

    of disasters and how each affects livestock.

    FEM 140-Emergency Planning (1) Introduces the fundamentals of the emergency planning process, including the rationale behind

    planning. Presents reasons for effective participation in the all-hazard emergency operations planning process to save lives and protect property threatened by disaster. Designed for emergency management personnel who are involved in developing

    an effective emergency planning system.

    FEM 143-Tribal Governments and Emergency Management (1)

    Provides participants the basic knowledge to build effective partnerships with tribal governments and work in concert with tribal governments

    to protect native people and property against all types of hazards. Throughout this course, tribal representatives speak about their history,

    culture, and way of life, and how to develop good relationships with tribal communities. Several lessons are devoted to specific program challenges that individuals may encounter in working with tribal governments to provide financial and technical assistance through disaster relief programs.

    FEM 144-Environmental and Historic Preservation (1)

    Provides students with the background and practical knowledge needed to participate in FEMA's environmental and historic review process. The course will also cover how the environmental/ historic preservation review process applies to various job responsibilities within FEMA's programs.

    FEM 146-Radiological Emergency Preparedness (REP) (1)

    Provides an understanding of FEMA's Radiological Emergency Preparedness (REP) planning and preparedness procedures. Introduces the regulatory basis, philosophy, and methodology

    of exercise evaluation and an evaluator's role in the process. Describes the responsibilities of an evaluator before, during, and after an exercise. Explores the six evaluation areas that are examined during exercise evaluation.

    FEM 150-Incident Command System (ICS) (1) Describes the history, features, principles, and organizational structure of the Incident Command System (ICS). It also explains the relationship between the Incident Command System (ICS) and the National Incident Management System (NIMS).

    Additionally, it provides training on and resources for personnel who are likely to assume a supervisory position within the Incident Command System (ICS).

    FEM 151-National Incident Management System (NIMS) (1) Provides a comprehensive understanding of the National Incident Management System (NIMS); purpose, principles, key components and benefits, in conjunction with the Incident Command System (ICS). Provides specific

    instruction as to the Planning, Public Information and Resource Management functions of NIMS.

    FEM 155-Emergency Radiological Response Transportation (1)

    Provides an understanding of radiological basics and biological effects from radiation exposure. Details a comprehensive introduction into potential hazards and mitigation procedures

    in resolving Radiological Transportation related incidents including radioactive product

    packaging and containment, survey instruments, decontamination and disposal modalities.

    FEM 156-Emergency Planning for Schools (1) Describes methods utilized to assess potential hazards that schools may face. Provides a comprehensive understanding of emergency management operations utilizing the Incident Command System (ICS) detailing roles and responsibilities in the school setting. Explains how to develop and test an Emergency Operations

    Plan that addresses potential hazards.

    FEM 157-Hazard Mitigation (1)

    Explains how to develop community support, identify potential hazards, assess risk, and utilize outside agency assistance with mitigation planning. Details the economic impact to communities that suffer disasters resulting in the need to address risk through the development and implementation of

    a Hazard Mitigation plan. Presents actual examples of successful hazard mitigation planning.

    FEM 158-Protecting Your Home and Small Business from Disaster (1)

    Presents in a non-technical format specific protective measures that can reduce the negative consequences of disasters upon homes or small businesses.

    FEM 159-National Response Framework (NRF) (1)

    Introduces students to the concepts and principles of the National Response Framework (NRF). Explores the roles and responsibilities of entities as specified in the NRF and the actions that support national response. Provides instruction on the NRF structures for implementing national-level policy and operational coordination for domestic incident response.

    FEM 161-Emergency Operation Center (EOC) (1)

    Describes the role, design, and functions of Emergency Operations Centers and their relationships as components of a multi-agency coordination system. The course contains disaster related examples, activities and case studies that relate to EOC’s and multi-agency coordination systems at

    the local, state and federal levels of government.

    FEM 170-Mitigation Grants Management (1)

    Provides students with the basic knowledge about using the web-based Mitigation Electronic Grants (eGrants) Management System. Introduces the functions of the applicant and subapplicant and focuses on administration, application, and monitoring aspects of the eGrants system.

    FEM 171-NIMS Communications (1) Provides students with the basic knowledge about the primary functions of the NIMS multi- agency coordination systems, communication and

    information management and intrastate mutual aid.

    FEM 173-Continuity of Operations Planning (1)

    Provides a brief overview of continuity, including its definition, the legal basis for continuity planning, the Continuity Program Management Cycle, and essential elements of a viable continuity program. Describes the Continuity Management Cycle, how it should be used to develop sound continuity of operations plans, and the roles and responsibilities of the Continuity Program Manager and other key players. Identifies the unique aspects of designing a continuity exercise. This course is for students seeking additional instruction and practice in Continuity of Operations Planning (COOP) as prescribed in Federal Continuity Directive (FCD) 1.

    FEM 174-Federal Disaster Assistance (1) Explores the full spectrum of the Points of Distribution (POD) mission during response operations. Introduces students to key Mission Assignment (MA) concepts and provides knowledge needed to carry out MA processing responsibilities.

    Examines the Public Assistance Program and the process applicants follow to receive grant funding assistance in the aftermath of a disaster.

    FEM 176-Continuity of Operations Planning for Pandemics Exercise (1) Introduces students to the characteristics of a pandemic influenza, the effects on every facet of society and the steps to minimize the effects. Covers fundamental continuity principles and processes with a pandemic focus. Describes strategies for social distancing and special

    protection for first responders, healthcare personnel, and other daily contact with the public.

    FEM 179-Emergency Management Recovery (1)

    Rapid and effective damage assessments save lives, protect property and the environment, and begin the process of recovery and mitigation. This course allows participants to discover planning techniques and resources for an effective damage assessment program. Topics covered include risk and vulnerability assessments, the benefits of the

    Unified Hazard Mitigation Assistance grant programs and application procedures, and prepares students to conduct risk assessments using the FEMA 452 and FEMA 455 Rapid Visual Screening for Buildings.

    FEM 180-Planning for Vulnerable Populations (1)

    Introduces students to the concepts, methods, and principles of emergency planning for children in disasters. Explores public and private guidance for implementing children’s preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs. Examines

    the unique needs that arise among children as a result of a disaster and/or emergency.

    FEM 181-Public-Private Partnerships: Planning, Maintenance, and

    Special Considerations (1)

    Introduces the role, terminology, and core concepts of working with public-private partnerships in the emergency management arena. Discusses the uses of such partnerships in improving overall community planning, response, recovery, and mitigation

    efforts. Instructs on recommended procedures for identifying, forming, maintaining, and evaluating these partnerships. Explores techniques for adapting and utilizing these principles and partners to improve collaboration on, readiness for, and management of special events in the community.

    FEM 182-Local and Tribal Mitigation Planning (1)

    Provides an awareness of rules, regulations, and responsibilities that are critical in creating and revising the hazard mitigation plan development. This course allows participants to effectively create, update, and revise hazard mitigation plans for local and tribal community populations. This course allows reviewers to interpret regulations affecting local and tribal hazard mitigation plans. Topics covered include local plans as covered in 44 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §201.6 or for tribal plans as described in 44 CFR §201.7.

    FEM 183-Public Works Role in Emergency Management (1)

    Examines the details of the public works function in emergency management. Designed to help communities improve public works efforts prior to,

    during, and after disasters. This course is intended to help build local capacity for public works including planning for disasters, developing practices and procedures, conducting damage assessment, and participating in after-action reviews. This course also includes details of how the function of public works is integrated into the overall strategy for responding to disasters and its relationship to

    other emergency management functions.

    FEM 184-Logistics and the Defense Priorities and Allocations System (DPAS) (1)

    Provides an overview of the logistics functions and organizational relationships within logistics from a Presidential disaster declaration to close- out of FEMA field offices. It examines how the Defense Priorities and Allocations System (DPAS) supports FEMA’s mission and describes how DPAS supports timely delivery of critical materials and services to meet requirements including priority

    ratings for contracts and orders, placement of rated orders, the roles of FEMA employees in the DPAS process, and how to address DPAS challenges.

    FEM 186-Hazard Mitigation and Disaster Workforce Basics (1)

    Equips students with the necessary knowledge to understand and communicate to the public the preparedness and prevention approaches that can reduce the impact of disasters. Students will also gain understanding of procedures for federal, state, local and private partners and the supporting role each agency plays in providing

    prevention and mitigation assistance for earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, tornados, and wildfires.

    FEM 187-Local Mitigation Plan Review (1) Equips students with the knowledge necessary to effectively review and determine if local mitigation plans meet federal mitigation planning requirements using the current FEMA Local Mitigation Plan

    Review Guide and developmental tools.

    FEM 188-Critical Infrastructure Protection (1) Enhances the knowledge of students in the field of critical infrastructure protection. Students will be exposed to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) and the National Response Framework (NRF) Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources (CI/KR) Support Annex. Students also learn the importance of vertical and horizontal collaborations across security partners and the effective strategies for the sustainment of these relationships.

    FEM 189-Workforce Preparedness (1) Introduces basic preparedness concepts and strategies for improving workplace, business and community preparedness. The course provides guidance to students on how to contribute to improve workplace security in addition to best practices for responding to an active shooter situation. The course identifies surveillance activities and the indicators associated with them while outlining prevention steps aimed at identifying, monitoring, and reporting suspicious activities.

    FEM 191-Emergency Management & Technical Tools Application (1) Introduces students to preparedness communication tools to reach all members of

    their communities during an emergency. Explores the National Emergency Technology (NET) Guard program, how GIS technology can support emergency management, and the Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS).

    FEM 192-Geospatial Information Systems Specialists (1)

    Introduces students to the disaster response role and responsibilities of a Geospatial Information Systems (GIS) Specialist. Explores what types of products need to be produced and what procedures must be followed to ensure that products are produced correctly and in a timely manner.

    FEM 193-Resilient Accord: Exercising Continuity Plans for Cyber Incidents (1) Introduces students to best practices for executing continuity operations during cyber-security incidents. Explores the importance of incorporating cyber security into continuity planning.

    FEM 194-Critical Infrastructure Security: Theft and Diversion - What You Can Do (1) Introduces students to the information they need to identify threats and vulnerabilities to critical infrastructure from the theft and diversion of critical resources, raw materials, and products that can be used for criminal or terrorist activities.

    Explores the actions that participants can take to reduce or prevent theft and diversion.

    FEM 195-Protecting Critical Infrastructure Against Insider Threats (1)

    Introduces students to critical infrastructure preparedness practices and measures to reduce the risk of insider threats. Explores methods

    for identifying and taking action against insider threats to critical infrastructure.

    FEM 196-Preparing for Mass Casualty Incidents: A Guide for Schools, Higher Education and Houses of Worship (1) Introduces students to recommended practices and resources for developing emergency plans to prepare for, respond to, and recover from mass casualty incidents.

    FEM 197-CERT Supplemental Training: The Incident Command System (1) Introduces students to principles of the Incident Command System (ICS) and helps learners understand how to effectively apply the principles through interactive real-life scenarios. Explores Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) activations, safety of disaster workers, acceptable leadership and organizational structures, and rescue effort approaches.

    FEM 198-Benefit-Cost Analysis Principles (1) Introduces students to fundamental Benefit-Cost Analysis (BCA) concepts and theory. Explores the process for gathering BCA data and the process

    for conducting analyses using the latest version of the Benefit Cost Toolkit. Examines projected damage amounts of hazard events; frequency, or

    Recurrence Interval (RI); and event duration analysis.

    FEM 199-Engineering Principles and Practices for Retrofitting Flood- Prone Residential Structures (1)

    Introduces students to engineering design and economic guidance on what constitutes feasible and cost-effective retrofitting measures for flood- prone residential and non-residential structures. This course serves as an overview of the contents of the revised Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) P-259, Engineering Principles and Practices for Retrofitting Flood-Prone Residential Structures.

    FEM 200-Homeland Security Geospatial Operations & Management (1)

    Introduces Homeland Security Geospatial Concept- of-Operations (GeoCONOPS) doctrine. Students will discover the importance of GeoCONOPS

    to the National Preparedness System, National Incident Management System (NIMS), and the Incident Command System (ICS). Explores the controls and functions of the DHS Common Operating Picture (COP) application.

    FEM 201-National Disaster Recovery Framework (NDRF) Overview (1) Introduces students to the National Disaster Recovery Framework (NDRF), which provides a new national framework for efficient and timely federal disaster recovery operations. This course will familiarize students with key concepts, core principles, and roles and responsibilities of NDRF

    leadership (including individuals and households; local, state, tribal, and federal levels; and between public, private, and nonprofit sectors).

    FEM 202-External Affairs Program Liaison (1)

    Introduces students to the skills needed to perform effectively as a program liaison within the Planning and Products component of External Affairs (EA). Explores the position requirements needed to collaborate with the Joint Field Office (JFO) while gathering information that EA

    may use in disaster response and recovery.

    FEM 203-Dams Sector Security Awareness (1)

    Explores methods for identifying potential security threats to the nation’s dams and levees and indicators of those threats. Includes an overview of protective measures used to reduce and manage risk within the Dams Sector.

    FEM 204-Emergency Food and Shelter National Board Program (1)

    Explores the requirements, eligibility for funding, and participant responsibilities of the Emergency Food and Shelter National Board Program. Includes an overview of the responsibilities of the National Board and the

    Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

    FEM 205-Fundamentals of Management and Support Coordination of

    Federal Disaster Operations (1)

    Explores the fundamental incident management knowledge needed by personnel occupying support roles during disaster operations. Includes an overview of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Qualification System (FQS) in incident management or incident support.

    FEM 206-Substantial Damage Estimator 2.0 Tool (1)

    Enables learners to successfully use the Substantial Damage Estimator 2.0 tool. Includes demonstrations that allow students to practice populating the electronic forms; saving individual-structure and community- wide data; running reports; and importing and exporting data to other formats, such as Excel.

    FEM 207-Radiological Accident Assessment Concepts (2)

    Explores the radiological consequences to the public following a release of radioactivity from nuclear power reactors and non-reactor incidents. Includes an overview of how to use this assessment as a basis for recommending protective actions to decision makers.

    FEM 209-Guardian Accord - Terrorism and Continuity Operations (1)

    Explores the importance of incorporating the specific risks of terrorism into continuity planning for Federal Department and Agencies, state, territorial, tribal and local jurisdictions. Includes an overview of the unique continuity planning considerations of terrorism.

    FEM 212-Homeland Security Building Design for Continuity of Operations (1) Provides guidance to the building sciences community working for public and private institutions, including Continuity of Operations (COOP) planners/managers, building officials, etc. Explores tools to help decision-makers assess the performance of their buildings against terrorist threats and to rank recommendations.

    FEM 213-Introduction to Community Emergency Response Teams (1) Provides an introduction to Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT) for those

    interested in completing the basic CERT training or as a refresher for current team members.

    FEM 214-Reconstitution Planning (1)

    Provides guidance to Federal Executive Branch departments and agencies for developing Continuity of Operations (COOP) Plans and Programs.

    Explores the advantages of developing effective and comprehensive reconstitution planning.

    FEM 215-Disaster Medical Coordination, Monitoring, and Surveillance (1)

    Introduces students to the concepts and principles of Emergency Responder Health Monitoring and Surveillance (ERHMS) system. The course provides instruction to leaders in organizations responsible for planning and executing an incident response that optimizes the health and safety of response, remediation, recovery, and volunteer workers.

    FEM 216-National Emergency Management Information System (NEMIS) Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) (1) Introduces students to the National Emergency Management Information System (NEMIS) and

    the knowledge needed to complete Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) applications. The course provides instruction on the database system used to track disaster data for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and grantee emergency management offices.

    Explores the modules or application areas that represent various functions within FEMA.

    FEM 217-Flood Insurance Coverage Basics (1) Introduces students to Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC) coverage concepts as part of the Standard Flood Insurance Policy. Explores the National

    Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and covered and non-covered building and personal property items. Examines the unique requirements for insuring condominiums and key characteristics and special adjustment issues for basement coverage.

    FEM 218-Flood Insurance Exposures Awareness (1)

    Introduces students to commercial exposures and how they are insured within the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). Explores the impact of mapping changes on property owners, insurance agents, lending institutions, and others. Examines the Coastal Barrier Resources System (CBRS) and Otherwise Protected Areas (OPAs).

    FEM 219-Principles of Flood Insurance Elevation (1)

    Introduces students to Elevation Certificate (EC) and how EC’s help floodplain administrators reduce flood risk. Explores lowest floor elevation for post-FIRM buildings in A or V zones as shown on the FEMA Elevation Certificate. Examines Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012 (BW 12) legislation and the Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act of 2014 (HFIAA).

    FEM 220-Fundamentals of Flood Insurance Claims (1)

    Introduces students to Commercial Claims procedures covered in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). Explores small and large commercial claims, certification requirements and adjuster authority, the General Property Form, and adjustment standards and requirements. Examines the history and organization of the NFIP, the Standard Flood Insurance Policy (SFIP), and the key terms and concepts that flood claims adjusters must know

    in order to accurately handle flood claims.

    FEM 221-Cultural Competence in Disaster: Before, During, and After (1)

  • Cultural Competence

    Explores literacy and competency considerations that promote effective engagement of groups diverse in their religious faith, cultural background, or accessibility needs at all stages of emergency response. Examines the history of marginalization

    experienced by many of these groups and its impacts on effective disaster response. Orients students

    to the unique needs, etiquette, and relationships involved in outreach to various religious faiths. Analyzes the intersection of religious, cultural, and accessibility needs with socioeconomic and

    political factors. Discusses the influences of culture and perception on action and their implications for delivering equitable assistance to all disaster victims.

    FEM 222-Introduction to Unified Federal Review (UFR) (1)

    Explores the Unified Federal Review (UFR) process and how it supports interagency coordination for Environmental and Historic Preservation (EHP) reviews during disaster recovery. Introduces students to EHP concepts in the UFR process.

    Examines the requirements of Federal Disaster Recovery Coordinators (FDRC) and Federal Coordinating Officers (FCO) in the UFR process.

    FEM 223-Federal Disaster Deployment Procedures (1)

    Explores established best practices for acclimation to working and living conditions at domestic incidents. Introduces students to practical tips, advice, requirements, and expectations during

    a deployment. Examines the operation of portable/mobile radios, the basics of how radio systems work, and the principles and concepts of interoperable communications. Presents Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

    Travel Rules and Regulations that are required to be followed when working for FEMA.

    FEM 224-Hazard Mitigation Flood Management in Disasters (1)

    Introduces students to the Hazard Management facets of the insurance and floodplain management fields, and offers an orientation regarding their major functional organizations, roles, and activities. Explores the legal basis and documentation for each field and the information sources relied upon by the organizations and responders involved.

    Provides training in the necessity of, and techniques and best practices for, critical collaboration in

    and between each field, and opportunities to apply those collaborative skills in practice.

    FEM 225-Telecommunicator Emergency Response Taskforce (TERT) Disaster Deployment Training (1)

    Provides basic preparedness training for Telecommunications Emergency Response Taskforce (TERT) personnel to enhance eligibility for and improve efficiency in potential deployment to disaster sites. Explores the mental, physical, and emotional elements of deployment preparedness, emphasizing a holistic, communication-based approach to addressing personal, familial, and situational concerns. Introduces the concept

    of stress and fatigue as additional challenges inherent to deployment, and details a variety of coping strategies to be used in planning for their mitigation. Orients TERT team leaders to legal authorizations and obligations pre-deployment, their role as inter-team communicators and facilitators, and responsibilities and potential surroundings during deployment scenarios.

    FEM 226-Introduction to the Facility Security and Risk Management Process (1)

    Introduces the Interagency Security Council (ISC) and orients students regarding its function, makeup, and authorities. Discusses the steps of the ISC’s Risk Management Process (RMP) and

    examines the impact of each on facility resilience and preparedness. Explores specific practical applications of ISC governance and regulation (including facility security calculation, operation of Facility Security Committees, facility security financing procedures, etc.) and investigates the role each application plays in executing the RMP.

    FEM 227-Ensuring Health and Safety in Emergency Response (1)

    Introduces students to the various health, safety, sanitation, and security issues present in an emergency response environment, and the role of Environmental Health Responders (EHRs) in addressing them. Explores, hazard-by-hazard, the most frequently or urgently encountered risks facing disaster responders, volunteers,

    and victims, and conducts a review of potential countermeasures. Provides an overview of governmental preparedness and mitigation initiatives undertaken to defend against these concerns.

    FSA: Fire Service Administration

    FSA 101-Fire Protection Systems (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 OR Prerequisites or Corequisites:

    EN 75 OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Provides information relating to the design features and operation of fire alarm systems. Design principles involved in structural fire protection and automatic suppression systems, including fire resistance

    and endurance, flame spread evaluation, smoke control, special hazard fire suppression systems, water supply for fire protection, and evaluation of sprinkler system designs will be examined.

    FSA 103-Fire Investigation and Analysis (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 OR Prerequisites or Corequisites:

    EN 75 OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Examines technical, investigative, legal, and managerial approaches to arson. Includes the fundamentals needed for proper fire science interpretation, recognition of origin and cause, preservation and documentation of evidence, scene security, motives of the fire setter, and types of fire causes.

    FSA 105-Risk Assessment, Reduction, and Safety (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 OR Prerequisites or Corequisites:

    EN 75 OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Examines the concepts of community sociology, the role of fire-related organizations within the

    community, and their impact on shaping community policy and master planning. Components of risk identification, risk evaluation, incident management, and accountability systems are examined.

    Note: If student is not an active firefighter, they must establish a mentor who is a FD Chief Officer.

    FSA 107-Disaster Planning and Response (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 OR Prerequisites or Corequisites:

    EN 75 OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Examines concepts and principles of community planning and response to fire, emergency, and natural disasters, including the Incident Command System (ICS), mutual aid and automatic response, training and preparedness, communications, hazardous materials planning, and disaster recovery.

    Note: If student is not an active firefighter, they must establish a mentor who is a FD Chief Officer.

    FSA 201-Fire and Emergency Services Administration (3)

    Prerequisite: FSA 101; Prerequisite or Corequisite: EN 101 Introduces the student to the organization and management of a fire and emergency services

    department and the relationship of government

    agencies to the fire service. New technologies, changing organizational structures, personnel and equipment, municipal fire protection planning, manpower and training, and financial

    management are examined. Emphasis is placed on fire and emergency service, ethics, and leadership from the perspective of the company officer.

    Note: If student is not an active firefighter, they must establish a mentor who is a FD Chief Officer.

    GG: Geography

    GG 101-Elements of Geography (3)

  • Gen Ed Geography

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72

    Explores elements of man's environment and the changes resulting from natural and human agents. Includes map reading and interpretation.

    GG 102-Cultural Geography (3)

  • Gen Ed Geography; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72

    Studies man in his regional settings, with emphasis on the interrelationships of physical and cultural phenomena.

    GG 201-Urban Social Geography (3)

  • Gen Ed Geography; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Examines concepts of cities and how culture interacts with urban landscapes.

     

    GIS: Geographic

    Information Systems

    GIS 101-Introduction to Geographic Information Systems with ArcGIS (3) Introduces the principles of geospatial technologies and the use/application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software and data. Develops

    student understanding of the fundamental concepts and applications of GIS, spatial data, and GIS software packages including Esri’s ArcGIS Desktop Suite. Discusses the need for skills in data management, conversion, and compilation using GIS software and provides practice in a computer

    lab environment. Note: Students taking the course should be proficient with the use of personal computers in a Windows operating environment.

    HE: Health Education

    HE 102-Nutrition in a Changing World (3)

  • Gen Ed Wellness

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR

    (ESL 72 and ESL 73) OR Corequisite: EN 75 Presents the basic principles of human nutrition with emphasis on the nutrients and factors

    that affect their use in the human body.

    HE 110-Nutrition Basics (1)

    Applies a basic knowledge of nutrition to enable the students to make good dietary decisions.

    Provides a basis for discerning healthy diets.

    HE 115-Stress Management Techniques (1) Introduces the basic concepts of stress management and focuses on coping

    strategies and techniques to reduce stress.

    HE 120-CPR/AED and Basic First Aid (1) Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces the student to the basics of emergency first aid treatment and safety. Students successfully completing this course will receive the American Heart Association (AHA) HeartSaver certification

    in First Aid, Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), and Automated External Defibrillator (AED).

    HE 130-Advanced Tai Chi - Cultural Perspective (3)

  • Cultural Competence

    Introduces the traditional Chinese meditative exercise known as Tai Chi. While participating in the low intensity physical skills that comprise Tai Chi, students will be introduced to the culture, philosophy, history, and practice of the exercise.

     

    HE 200-Principles and Application of Nutrition (3)

    Prerequisites: One semester of college biology either BI 100, BI 101, BI 103 or BI 107

    Introduces the principles of nutrition for the maintenance of good health throughout the life-cycle. Applications of nutritional principles are presented via the connection between diet and the prevention and treatment of disease. Investigates the socioeconomic, ecological and political factors that shape national nutritional policy and ultimately affect personal health.

    HE 201-Stress Management (3)

  • Gen Ed Wellness

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR

    (ESL 72 and ESL 73) OR Corequisite: EN 75 Examines current theories regarding the nature and sources of stress in life. Students are

    introduced to the physiology and psychology

    of stress. A variety of stress management techniques and coping strategies are explored.

    HE 204-Health Education (3)

  • Gen Ed Wellness

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR

    (ESL 72 and ESL 73) OR Corequisite: EN 75 Covers basic areas of health, including mental health, fitness, nutrition, weight control,

    sexual health, drugs and alcohol, disease and

    consumer and environmental health.

    HI: History

    HI 101-History of Western Civilization (3)

  • Gen Ed History

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Surveys the development of Western civilization from ancient times to 1500.

    HI 102-History of Western Civilization (3)

  • Gen Ed History

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Covers Western history from 1500 to the present.

    HI 106-Introduction to Historic Preservation (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Provides a general overview of the different aspects of historic preservation, including downtown revitalization, historic site management, preservation legislation and education, historic

    architecture, and the history of historic preservation in the United States. Research methodologies

    will include using library resources, public records, maps, historic documents, images, oral histories, and folklore. Students will make on site visits to historic preservation projects.

    course descriptions

    image

    HI 107-Introduction to Archives and Manuscripts (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Provides an introduction to the role of archives and manuscript repositories in preserving and providing access to historical records, and will present an overview of the theory and practice of archives management. The student will approach research from the other side of the reference desk and learn how primary source material is arranged and made available to researchers. The course will

    also cover such research-related topics as copyright, privacy, fair use, and ethical standards. This course will benefit those interested in a potential career

    as an archivist, manuscripts curator, or special librarian, as well as those public historians likely to utilize archival collections in their work.

    HI 121-World History I (3)

  • Gen Ed History; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Examines the rise and development of agriculture, the development of primary states, secondary states and empires, and the origins and spread

    of monotheistic culture. This course is a survey of World History from its foundation through 1500.

    HI 201-History of the United States (3)

  • Gen Ed History

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Examines the economic, political and social forces that have shaped the patterns of life, institutions and thought in the United States through the Civil War.

    HI 202-History of the United States (3)

  • Gen Ed History

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Covers United States history from Reconstruction to the present.

    HI 212-Civil War (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Examines the causes of the Civil War, the constitutional crisis confronting the Union, the conduct of the war by both the Union and

    Confederacy, the economic and social conditions of the homefront, the status and condition of African Americans and the wartime origins of Reconstruction.

    HI 213-History of the South (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    A history of the South from the Colonial period to the present. Examines the Golden Age

    of the Chesapeake, antebellum society, the institution of slavery, development of a regional identity, the War for Southern Independence, Reconstruction, readjustment of racial patterns and the rise of the New South and the Sun Belt.

    HI 214-The Civil Rights Movement (3) Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Explores the history of the Civil Rights movement in twentieth-century America. It begins with

    an overview of segregation, examines in detail the efforts of the movement to overcome Jim Crow discrimination, and concludes with an assessment of the movement's legacy.

    HI 215-Constitutional History of the United States (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Examines the Constitution and its impact within the context of the government, law, and politics. Topics covered include the origins of the Constitution, the development of judicial nationalism, the impact

    of slavery, the conflict leading up to the Civil War, reconstruction, the 1890s, the creation of the modern state, the New Deal era, the 1960s, and the movement toward a conservative constitutionalism.

    HI 217-African-American History (3)

  • Gen Ed History; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Surveys African-American history from the arrival of the first Africans in 1619 to the present.

    Includes the major economic, political, and social forces that have helped shape the role of the African American in the history of America.

    HI 220-World War II (3)

  • Gen Ed Social Science

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: EN 101 Surveys the major military and social developments of WWII through films

    and selected readings. Multicultural and

    multinational perspectives are included.

    HI 221-The Sixties (3)

  • Gen Ed History

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Examines one of America’s most turbulent decades: the 1960s. This course explores the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, the Anti-War Movement, and changing cultural and social mores. Emphasis will include an examination of the history, politics, literature, and music of the era.

    HOS: Hospitality

    Culinary Tourism

    HOS 109-Introduction to Culinary Arts (2) Concentrates on skills and attributes needed to fill entry level culinary and food services positions. Instruction will assist students in practicing communication skills, utilizing listening skills to follow directions, practicing basic math skills as applied to a culinary arts setting, and reading to gain information and to perform assignments and tasks as directed. Through discussion students

    will gain insight into a career in restaurants and food/beverage operations. Students will also learn resume writing and job interviewing techniques.

    HOS 110-Introduction to Hospitality Management (3) Prerequisites: (MA 80 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test) AND

    {(Prerequisite: EN 70) OR (Prerequisite or Corequisite: EN 75 or [ESL 72 and ESL 73])} Introduces students to various careers in the

    hospitality industry and history of hospitality.

    Develops an understanding of the hospitality industry by taking a management perspective in introducing students to the organization and structure of various sectors including: travel and

    tourism, meeting/convention and event planning, hotels, healthcare, restaurants, retail, contract food service, clubs, cruise ships, casino hotels, and more. Examines the forces and issues that are shaping the current and future hospitality industry. Topics include various aspects of hospitality operations and information on delivering excellent customer service. Students will earn certification from the

    American Hotel Lodging Educational Institute (AHLEI) as a Certified Guest Service Professional (CGSP®).

    HOS 112-Culinary I (3)

    Prerequisites: (MA 80 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test) and (Grade of C or better in HOS 121)

    Examines the basic concepts, skills, and attributes related to preparation of food: knife skills, product identification, and culinary terminology. Discusses food service industry history, professional careers, and trends. Develops, executes, and converts standardized recipes. Learns and applies classical cooking principles and techniques to food preparation.

    Topics include soup, stock, and sauce preparation; egg cookery; product qualities and preparation of vegetables, fruit, and starches. Strengthen knife skills, recipe conversions and measurements, and sanitation and safe food handling practices. Extra fees required.

    HOS 113-Culinary II (3)

    Prerequisite: HOS 112

    Emphasizes meat, poultry, and seafood qualities, specifications, and fabrication. Learns and applies various cooking techniques for proteins. Expands knowledge of sauces, vegetables, and starch cookery with demonstrations of proper plating techniques. Emphasis is on building production skills in a commercial setting. Extra fees required.

    HOS 114-Baking I (3)

    Prerequisite: (Grade of C or better in HOS 121) and (Prerequisite or Corequisite: HOS 112)

    Provides students with the basic skills required for entry-level work in a bakery or pastry shop of a food service operation. These skills include working in a safe and sanitary manner; reading, scaling,

    and accurately following a recipe; demonstrating proper use of terminology, tools, and equipment; preparing, baking, and evaluating cookies,

    cakes, breads, pastries, pies, and tarts. Beginning plating techniques, cake decorating, and dietary alternatives explored. Extra fees required.

    HOS 121-Sanitation and Food Safety (1)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 OR Prerequisites or Corequisites:

    EN 75 OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Develops an understanding of basic principles of sanitation and safety in food, beverage, and hospitality operations. The course focuses on procedures and protocol recommended for the

    prevention of foodborne illnesses. After introduction to HACCP planning, students will develop a HACCP plan. Successful passing of the National Restaurant Association ServSafe exam is required and earns certification as a ServSafe Food Protection Manager.

    HOS 123-Purchasing & Cost Control (3) Prerequisite or Corequisite: HOS 111 and HOS 121 Examines food purchasing as a process and emphasizes the dynamics of managing the flow of

    food through the operation. Provides an introduction to food recognition and basic menu planning and their effects on production, service, labor and other financial control procedures. Emphasizes establishing operating standards, monitoring actual results and taking corrective action to account for variances.

    Introduces students to the budgeting process with strong emphasis placed on control of prime costs. Offers discussion on selection, training and retention of employees and the effect of Human Resource functions on daily operations and cost control.

    HOS 161-Event Management (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 OR Prerequisites or Corequisites:

    EN 75 OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Discusses and demonstrates aspects of planning and implementing an event for success. Included is a project where students will be involved in

    a hands-on experience of planning an event while utilizing the skills learned in class.

    HOS 163-Hospitality Operations (3) Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in HOS 121 and Prerequisite or Corequisite: HOS 110

    Learn the primary responsibilities of a hospitality manager and principles and practices involved in managing the day to day operations of a hospitality business. Topics include various aspects of hospitality operations such as classifying hotels and guests, hotel organization, front office operations, hospitality applications and systems, safety and security risks and controls, housekeeping operations, front office accounting, reading financial reports, maximizing sales, and facility maintenance.

    HOS 210-Garde Manger (4)

    Prerequisite: HOS 113 or permission of program manager

    Discuss and demonstrate cold food production.

    Preparation of display trays and platters with emphasis on presentation design and garnishes. Prepare canapés, hors d’oeuvres, appetizers, forcemeats, cheeses, and food preservation items. Extra fees required.

    course descriptions

    HOS 214-Baking II (4)

    Prerequisite: HOS 114

    Builds upon learned basic skills and theories to develop proficiency in baking and pastry

    production. Students will further explore a range of classical and modern baking preparations

    for breads, doughs, cakes, custards, fillings, toppings, and pastries. Develop design, finishing, and plating techniques. Extra fees required.

    HOS 216-Food and Beverage Operations (3) Prerequisite or Corequisite: HOS 123 or HOS 163 Provides an analysis of different types of food service operations, beginning with an overview of the

    food service segment of the hospitality industry. Detailed consideration is given to food and beverage operations, food service marketing, menu planning, nutrition concerns, menu cost and pricing strategies, production, service, beverage management, sanitation and safety issues, facility design and equipment, accounting and food service automation.

    HOS 240-International and American Regional Cuisine (4)

  • Cultural Competence

    Prerequisite: HOS 113 or permission of program manager; Corequisite: HOS 250

    Prepares, tastes, and evaluates traditional regional dishes from the United States, Central and South America, the Caribbean, Asia, Europe, and the Mediterranean. Students will explore these cuisines from a cultural, geographical, religious, and historical perspective. Emphasis is placed

    on ingredients, flavor profiles, preparations, and techniques for these cuisines. Develops an expanded understanding and appreciation of why and how people from diverse world cultures approach food and cooking differently. Extra fees required.

    HOS 250-Restaurant Production and Service (4)

    Prerequisite: HOS 163 or HOS 210 or permission of program manager; Corequisite: HOS 240 or HOS 263 Provides the capstone student experience of applying

    learned knowledge and skills in an operational

    restaurant setting. Students rotate through the dining room and kitchen in this intensive course. Front-of- the-House students train and carry out dining room rules of service from set-up to closeout. Back-of-the- House students learn brigade station responsibilities of à la carte preparation, cooking, and plating techniques. All students work together to provide quality customer service to guests. Extra fees required.

    HOS 261-Applied Hospitality Management (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: HOS 163 or permission of program manager

    Provides leadership and management tools in the hospitality industry to enhance guest service and profitability by introducing students to topics such as managing organizational change, traditional management roles and styles versus leadership in the twenty-first century, quality management, continuous improvement, power and empowerment, communication skills, goal setting and coaching, high-performance teams, diversity, strategic career planning, and ethics.

    HOS 263-Hospitality Business Analysis (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: HOS 261 or permission of program manager

    Learn a new approach to business analysis utilizing revenue management, which is multidisciplinary as it blends elements of marketing, operations, and finance management. Students will learn about the elements in revenue management and how to utilize them to perform business analysis and make recommendations for business enhancements.

    HOS 265-HCTI Practicum (1)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: HOS 113 or HOS 261 Provides students with supervised experience in a hospitality/culinary/tourism setting. In-service

    training and practical experience totaling a minimum

    of 240 hours in an approved hospitality operation, lodging, commercial or institutional food service/ restaurant, meeting planning, or the related travel/tourism field. Focuses on the acquisition of employability, business, hospitality and/or culinary technical and problem-solving skills that will give students the tools to become successfully employed in the hospitality, culinary, and tourism industry.

    HS: Human Services

    HS 102-Human Relations (3)

  • Gen Ed Human Services; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72 or Corequisite: EN 75

    Introduces students to the fundamentals of interpersonal communication and examines such communication in the context of culture,

    ethnicity, gender, age, and race in particular. As an experiential course, it seeks to increase the skills and sensitivity necessary for successful human relationships in a diverse global, national and local community. The impact of the increasing use

    of interactive technologies is also examined.

    HS 103-Introduction to Social Work and the Human Services (4)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72 Surveys the philosophies of the field of social work and all of the human services. Examines the historical

    and theoretical approaches to the understanding of

    social work and the agencies that deal with delivery of services to members of society. Includes the interrelationship of human services and examines the knowledge, values and skills of the helping process. Particular emphasis is placed on the concept of human diversity and the impact of oppression and discrimination. This course will highlight the human needs that social workers address across the life span with particular emphasis on the needs of older adults.

    HS 104-Mediation Theory and Practice (3) Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72 Explores mediation as a conflict resolution

    method used in today’s society. Students will

    learn the skill set necessary to use the mediation process in formal and informal situations.

    HS 203-Introduction to Counseling and Interviewing (3)

    Prerequisite: PS 101

    Presents an overview of counseling theory, with focus on the development of specific helping behaviors.

    HS 204-Ethics and Practice Issues in the Human Services and Addiction Counseling (3)

    Prerequisite: HS 203; Corequisite: INTR 103 Integrates a study of ethical and practice issues in the human service field with the student's

    experience in the internship education practicum.

    Special attention will be given to the special ethical issues in the addictions field.

    HS 205-Fundamentals of Addictions (3)

    Prerequisite: HS 203

    Presents major theoretical approaches to the field of addictions, and introduction to the twelve core functions of the alcohol and drug abuse counselor. This course will include skill development training for the beginning alcohol and drug counselor.

    HS 206-Pharmacology of Psychoactive Drugs (3)

    Prerequisite: PS 101

    Presents the basic pharmacological and neurophysiological fundamentals of licit and illicit drug use. The primary focus of the course is the explanation of how drugs may

    alter body and brain function and how these alterations influence and mediate human behavior. Suggested for human service majors, especially those interested in addictions, current or potential health care professionals.

    HS 207-Theory and Practice of Group Counseling (3)

    Prerequisite: HS 203

    Presents the theory and practice of using groups as a counseling intervention in the human services. There will be a presentation of types of groups, general principles of groups, stages of evolution of groups, ethical and professional issues, and special emphasis on the use of groups in the drug and alcohol field.

    HU: Humanities

    HU 104-Introduction to Digital Humanities (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces the student to the digital tools that are transforming the study of the humanities as well as the processes for planning, managing, and evaluating digital humanities projects.

    Equips the student to apply digital tools and techniques to a variety of disciplines including English, History, Philosophy, and Social Sciences.

    HU 201-Humanities I: Culture/Human Experience (To the Renaissance) (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Surveys Western culture through a study of philosophy, the visual, literary and performing arts from the Ancient World to the Renaissance.

    HU 202-Humanities II: Culture/Human Experience (Renaissance to the Present) (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Surveys Western culture through study of art, music, literature and philosophy from the sixteenth century to the present.

    HU 203-Special Topics in the Humanities (3) Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    An intra-disciplinary umbrella course consisting of a series of three-credit courses that address timely topics in the humanities.

    HU 203B-Civilization and Culture: Britain (3) Corequisite: Participation in London Work/Study Abroad Discover key social, cultural, and political characteristics of contemporary British society.

    Compare and contrast British and American assumptions and practices. The course structure is based on a series of seminars led by the core instructor with complementary lectures delivered by guest speakers specializing in specific topics.

    HU 206-Media and Human Values (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: EN 101 or EN 101H

    This team-taught honors seminar explores media and human values as interdisciplinary concepts. These concepts will be examined in their social, literary and visual environments, and an emphasis on synthesizing conclusions reached. Students will be expected to conduct independent study and present results of research to the class.

    HU 210-The Language of Hip Hop (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: EN 101

    Examines the role of language, both verbal and non-verbal, in the aesthetics, intercultural

    communication, and cultural practices of hip hop through the study of the origins and evolution

    of the culture, moving on to key topics including authenticity, class, and language ideology. Students will identify current and historical elements of hip hop culture in the US. Through multimedia analysis, critical reading and listening, and student led discussion, students will develop skills necessary

    to critically analyze and explore the language of hip hop and survey its historical development, political significance, and social influence.

    INTR: Internship

    INTR 101-Internship (1)

    Provides the student with an opportunity to gain knowledge and skills from a planned work experience in the student's chosen career field. In addition to meeting Core Learning Outcomes,

    jointly developed Specific Learning Outcomes are selected and evaluated by the Faculty Internship Advisor, Work-Site Supervisor, and the student. Internship placements are directly related to the student's program of study and provide learning experiences not available in the classroom setting. Internships provide entry-level, career-related experiences, and workplace competencies that employers value when hiring new employees.

    Internships may also be used as an opportunity to explore career fields. Students must meet with the Internship Coordinator prior to registering.

    INTR 102-Internship (2)

    Provides the student with an opportunity to gain knowledge and skills from a planned work experience in the student's chosen career field. In addition to meeting Core Learning Outcomes,

    jointly developed Specific Learning Outcomes are selected and evaluated by the Faculty Internship Advisor, Work-Site Supervisor, and the student. Internship placements are directly related to the student's program of study and provide learning experiences not available in the classroom setting. Internships provide entry-level, career-related experiences, and workplace competencies that employers value when hiring new employees.

    Internships may also be used as an opportunity to explore career fields. Students must meet with the Internship Coordinator prior to registering.

    INTR 103-Internship (3)

    Provides the student with an opportunity to gain knowledge and skills from a planned work experience in the student's chosen career field. In addition to meeting Core Learning Outcomes,

    jointly developed Specific Learning Outcomes are selected and evaluated by the Faculty Internship Advisor, Work-Site Supervisor, and the student. Internship placements are directly related to the student's program of study and provide learning experiences not available in the classroom setting. Internships provide entry-level, career-related experiences, and workplace competencies that employers value when hiring new employees.

    Internships may also be used as an opportunity to explore career fields. Students must meet with the Internship Coordinator prior to registering.

    ITR: American Sign Language Interpreting

    ITR 104-Introduction to Interpreting (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72) and (ASLS 106 and ASLS 202);

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: ASLS 203 Introduces students to the profession of sign language interpreting. Covers the history of

    interpreting as a field of professional practice,

    the ethical and performance standards, the impact of legislation on the field, the phenomena of cross cultural dynamics, knowledge of environmental conditions, and the role of

    the interpreter as cultural mediator.

    ITR 110-Interactive Discourse Analysis (3) Prerequisite: ITR 104; Corequisites: ITR 112 and ITR 114 Focuses on the analysis of discourse in dialogic genres of English and American Sign Language

    (ASL). Awareness of the features of language use in everyday life. Students transcribe and analyze interaction discourse features of conversations,

    explanations, interviews, discussions, and other types of dialogue genres while reading and discussing theoretical notions underlying language use.

    ITR 112-Foundations of Interpreting (3) Prerequisite: ITR 104; Corequisites: ITR 110, ITR 114 Introduces students to the theory and application of the interpreting process. Students will

    practice receptive skills and process tasks needed for interpretation. Focus will primarily be on intralingual language exercises including

    shadowing, prediction and anticipation, memory enhancement, text analysis for goal and main points, and paraphrasing. Process models and descriptions will be covered and application will be provided to observed interpretations. Exercises will be conducted in both English and ASL. The goal

    of the course is to develop cognitive processing skills involved in the interpreting process.

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    ITR 114-Consecutive Interpreting (3) Prerequisite: ITR 104; Corequisites: ITR 110, ITR 112 Develops consecutive interpreting skills and prepares students for the simultaneous interpreting process.

    Students will compare ASL and English semantic/ syntactic structures to the consecutive interpreting process. Focus in the course will be on source

    and target text analysis, vocabulary expansion, and interpreting process skill development.

    ITR 212-ASL to English Interpreting I (3)

    Prerequisites: ITR 110, ITR 112, ITR 114;

    Corequisites: ITR 214, ITR 216

    Focuses on the process of interpretation, provides practice of requisite skills and process tasks

    and applies skills and interpreting theory to the translation process. The course of study focuses on lexical development, syntactical language comparisons, voice production techniques, text/discourse/interpreting process analysis, semantic mapping, and diagnostic assessment.

    ITR 214-English to ASL Interpreting I (3)

    Prerequisites: ITR 110, ITR 112, ITR 114;

    Corequisites: ITR 212, ITR 216

    Provides in-depth study and practice of ASL/ English interpretation through the understanding and use of the simultaneous mode of interpreting. Provides techniques of translating the source language, English to the target, and American Sign Language (ASL) in a simultaneous manner.

    ITR 216-Transliterating I (3)

    Prerequisites: ITR 110, ITR 112, ITR 114;

    Corequisites: ITR 212, ITR 214

    Covers the process of transliteration. The process moves along a continuum from ASL to a signed form of English. Specific subtasks are isolated in order to focus on transliterating skill development, enhancing component skills, and incorporating ASL features. These skills are integrated into the performance of beginning to intermediate tasks.

    ITR 222-ASL to English Interpretation II (3)

    Prerequisites: ITR 212, ITR 212, ITR 216;

    Corequisites: ITR 224, ITR 226, ITR 230

    Provides students with additional practice in specific skill areas related to ASL to English interpretation.

    Text/discourse/process analysis, lexical and syntactic development, and voice production techniques

    for simultaneous ASL to English interpretation. Course content is at an intermediate to advanced level of speed and complexity. Students will work primarily from videotaped language models.

    ITR 224-English to ASL Interpreting II (3)

    Prerequisites: ITR 212, ITR 214, ITR 216;

    Corequisites: ITR 222, ITR 226, ITR 230

    Allows students to continue practicing rendering the target language (ASL) from the source language (English) simultaneously. Provides preparation

    for Internship. Continued emphasis and focus is on appropriate use of lexical and syntactic principles and non-manual behaviors of ASL.

    ITR 226-Transliterating II (3)

    Prerequisites: ITR 212, ITR 214, ITR 216;

    Corequisites: ITR 222, ITR 224, ITR 230

    Expands the process of visually representing English. Students will focus on the expansion and enhancement of transliterating skills

    at the English end of the ASL-English continuum. Students will incorporate ASL features into intermediate to advanced level texts presented in a simultaneous mode.

    ITR 230-Internship Seminar & Interpreting Environments (2)

    Prerequisites: ITR 212, ITR 214, ITR 216;

    Corequisites: ITR 222, ITR 224, ITR 226

    Introduces students to the requirements, guidelines, professional practices, and types of placements

    for field experience. Students will discuss protocol, skills, ethics, and business practices needed for specific site placements. Discusses the roles and responsibilities within team interpreting. Briefly discusses various interpreting environments.

    LA: Paralegal

    LA 100-Introduction to Law (3)

  • Cultural Competence

    Prerequisite: [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR EN 70 OR Prerequisite or Corequisite: EN 75 OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Presents an overview of the legal profession. Provides detailed introduction to the structure and function of the American Legal System, law office management, standard operating procedures and systems. Offers overview of fundamental areas of substantive and procedural law, interviewing and investigation, and research and writing. Infuses ethics and professionalism. Discusses legal aspects of current topics to aid students in acquiring

    an appreciation of the dynamic role of law in our changing society. Promotes understanding needed to participate effectively in our diverse global, national, and local communities.

    LA 103-Ethics for the Legal Professional (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: LA 100

    Concentrates on the ethical responsibilities that have been established by statutes, courts

    decisions, court rules, and professional associations affecting legal assistants/paralegals and lawyers. Includes conflict of interest, confidentiality, competence, solicitation, fees and billing, obligations of attorneys to clients, and protection of client funds. Covers the nature of supervision

    in order to avoid unauthorized practice of law.

    LA 104-Contracts (3)

    Prerequisites or Corequisites: LA 100 and EN 101 Covers the fundamental principles of contract law; the manner in which contracts are formed;

    the elements of a valid contract; the rights and

    obligations of various parties to a contract, as well as the rights of third parties; and available remedies when a contract is breached.

    LA 105-Torts (3)

    Prerequisites or Corequisites: LA 100 and EN 101 Covers the fundamental principles of tort law: intentional torts, negligence, and strict liability.

    Examines causes of action, defenses, and remedies,

    Develops skills to investigate and evaluate tort claims. Introduces tort litigation procedures and documents.

    LA 106-Technology for the Legal Profession (3) Prerequisite or Corequisite: LA 100

    Prepares students for the increasing levels of computer literacy demanded by the legal profession. Covers the basic features of at least one commonly used word processing program, database program, spreadsheet program and legal specific programs

    for calendaring, timekeeping and billing. Offers basic features of computer-assisted legal research and other electronic resources. Incorporates current technological trends used by the legal profession.

    LA 200-Legal Research (3)

    Prerequisites or Corequisites: LA 100 and EN 101 Offers working knowledge of techniques of legal research. Examines various sources of law and

    types of research tools. Emphasis on using a law

    library. Develops book-based and computer- assisted research skills. Outlines development of a research strategy plan to locate and update applicable law. Analyze cases, statutes, and report findings. Stresses proper citation form.

    LA 205-Legal Writing (3)

    Prerequisites: EN 101 and (LA 200 or LA 110) Offers working knowledge of techniques of legal writing in the preparation of a variety of

    legal documents such as legal correspondence,

    briefs, memoranda, and pleadings. Incorporates analysis and synthesis of research to draft legal documents. Emphasizes the importance of proper format and citation.

    LA 210-Estates and Probate (3)

    Prerequisites: LA 100 and EN 101

    Covers basic legal concepts and fundamental principles of law as applied to the more common forms of wills, trusts, and intestacy, as well as organization and jurisdiction of

    the probate court. Examines strategies and tools available for estate planning. Develops a working knowledge of resources that reflect the process and procedures required by law for estate administration. Includes drafting of a simple will and advanced directive. Explores

    course procedures and public records research. Presents computer applications in estate law.

    LA 220-Civil Litigation (3)

    Prerequisites: LA 100 and EN 101

    Provides a comprehensive study of civil litigation, state, and federal court structure and procedure. Explores components of the litigation process. Includes drafting pleadings and other documents associated with litigation. Incorporates use of technology in the litigation process. Develops skills to effectively and ethically support the litigation process. Introduces administrative procedure.

    LA 230-Real Estate (3)

    Prerequisites: LA 100 and EN 101

    Covers basic legal concepts and fundamental principles of real estate law. Topics include property rights; types of land ownership/estates; easements; title and use of real estate; agreements for sale; financing; conveyancing; title insurance; settlement procedures; recording and post-closing matters that deal with residential, commercial, condominiums, and planned communities; and landlord/tenant matters. Develops a working knowledge of resources that reflect the process and procedures required by law.

    LA 240-Family Law (3)

    Prerequisites: LA 100 and EN 101

    Explores the fundamentals and emerging issues in family law. Topics include marriage, separation,

    divorce, alimony, child custody and visitation, child support, disposition of property and legal rights

    of children, adoption, guardianship, and domestic relations. Explores court procedures, public records research, and the mediation process. Presents computer applications in domestic relations practice.

    LAR: Arabic

    LAR 101-Introductory Arabic I (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Covers the fundamentals of the Arabic language both written and spoken pertinent to the first semester. Offers a strong foundation in the language through development of vocabulary, grammar, reading and conversational skills. Offers insights into Arabic culture and customs.

    LAR 102-Introductory Arabic II (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: LAR 101

    Continues the fundamentals of the Arabic language, both written and spoken, pertinent to the second semester. Offers a strong foundation in the language through further development of vocabulary, grammar, reading and conversational skills. Provides insights into Arabic culture and customs.

    LC: Chinese

    LC 101-Introductory Chinese I (4)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Covers fundamentals of the Mandarin Chinese written and spoken language. Offers a strong foundation in the language through development of vocabulary, grammar, reading, and conversational skills. Offers insights into Chinese culture and customs.

    LF: French

    LF 101-Introductory French I (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Presents study of French grammar and vocabulary with selected readings in contemporary

    literature. Develops competence in and knowledge of French language and culture.

    LF 102-Introductory French II (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: LF 101

    A continuation of LF 101 with increased emphasis on literature and idiomatic speech.

    LF 201-Intermediate French I (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisite: LF 102

    Covers advanced grammar and composition with selected readings.

    LF 202-Intermediate French II (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisite: LF 201

    A continuation of LF 201. Readings in representative French prose and poetry form the basis of class discussion.

    LG: German

    LG 101-Introductory German I (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Introduces German grammar and vocabulary. Develops oral and reading skills in the language and competence in answering basic questions. Through the reading of lifelike dialogs, students gain insight into German culture, thought and expression.

    LG 102-Introductory German II (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: LG 101

    Continuation of LG 101. Introduces more complicated readings.

    LG 201-Intermediate German I (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: LG 102

    Covers advanced grammar and composition with selected readings.

    LG 202-Intermediate German II (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: LG 201

    A continuation of LG 201. Introduces and discusses readings in representative German prose and poetry.

    LI: Italian

    LI 101-Introductory Italian I (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Presents the fundamentals of the Italian written and spoken language. Develops a firm foundation in the language with emphasis on the development of vocabulary, grammar, reading and conversational skills. Offers insight into Italian culture and customs.

    LI 102-Introductory Italian II (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: LI 101

    Serves as a continuation of the previous introductory course in Italian, with intensive oral work and a study of grammar with emphasis on reading and comprehension.

    LI 201-Intermediate Italian I (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: LI 102

    Presents advanced grammar and composition with selected readings pertinent to intermediate level. Group discussions in Italian.

    LL: Latin

    LL 101-Introductory Latin I (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Introduces classical Latin language. Presents the study of Latin grammar and vocabulary with the goal of developing reading skills in the language. Offers insight into Roman literature, thought and expression through the reading of Latin sentences and passages derived from ancient authors.

    LL 102-Introductory Latin II (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: LL 101

    Provides a continuation of LL 101. Introduces elementary readings in Latin literature.

    LL 201-Intermediate Latin I (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: LL 102

    Presents Latin grammar through lecture, practice, review and the reading of ancient authors.

    Includes medieval Latin and the Vulgate Roman and Greek culture appropriate to the readings.

    Increases English vocabulary by recognition of English words derived through Latin.

    LL 202-Intermediate Latin II (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: LL 201

    Reviews Latin grammar. Presents Virgil's Aeneid, Books I, II, IV and VI. Includes Roman and Greek culture and mythology appropriate to the readings.

    LR: Russian

    LR 101-Introductory Russian I (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Covers fundamentals of the Russian written and spoken language. Offers a strong foundation in the language through development of vocabulary, grammar, reading and conversational skills. Offers insights into Russian culture and customs.

    LR 102-Introductory Russian II (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: LR 101

    Covers fundamentals of the Russian written and spoken language pertinent to the second semester. Offers a strong foundation in the language through development of vocabulary,

    grammar, reading and conversational skills. Offers insights into Russian culture and customs.

    LR 201-Intermediate Russian I (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: LR 102 or two year of high school Russian Continues development of reading, conversational, and translational skills and habits with emphasis on

    proper use of grammar and knowledge of vocabulary.

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    LS: Spanish

    LS 101-Introductory Spanish I (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Introduces Spanish grammar and vocabulary. Develops oral and reading skills in the language and competence in answering basic questions. Through the reading of lifelike dialogs, students gain insight into Spanish culture, thought and expression.

    LS 102-Introductory Spanish II (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: LS 101

    A continuation of LS 101. Introduces more complicated readings.

    LS 201-Intermediate Spanish I (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisite: LS 102

    Presents advanced grammar and composition with selected readings pertinent to the intermediate level. Group discussions in Spanish.

    LS 202-Intermediate Spanish II (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisite: LS 201

    A continuation of LS 201. Students discuss readings in representative Spanish prose and poetry.

    LS 211-Spanish Conversation I (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisite: LS 102

    Develops oral fluency and language skills through interpretation and discussion of select readings, videos, songs and cultural experiences.

    MA: Mathematics

    MA A-Instruction with Algebra (0) [2]

    Supplements MA 103A and MA 206A.

    MA S-Algebraic Support (0) [3]

    Supplements MA 130S.

    MA 83-Educator Preparation in Mathematics (0) [2]

    Prerequisites: (Placement in EN 70 or ESL 70 or higher on the reading placement test) AND (A grade of B or better in MA 80 or appropriate score on the mathematics placement test)

    Develops introductory Algebra skills. Topics include real numbers, algebraic expressions, solving and graphing equations, exponents, factoring polynomials, and functions. Technology and PRAXIS preparation are integrated with traditional skill practice throughout the course.

    MA 103-Foundations of Mathematics (3)

  • Gen Ed Math

    Prerequisite: MA 81 or MA 83 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test

    Covers various topics within mathematics for those who need a survey of mathematical principles rather than the in-depth analysis required for a mathematics or science-related program. Areas covered may include problem-solving strategies, logic, numeration systems, set theory, classification of numbers, algebra, financial management, geometry, measurement and right triangle trigonometry, probability, statistics, graphs, systems of equations, linear programming, graph theory, and voting theory. Students cannot receive credit for both MA 103 and MA 103A.

    MA 103A-Foundations of Mathematics (3)

  • Gen Ed Math

    Prerequisites: MA 80 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test AND placement in EN 70 or ESL 70 or higher on the reading placement test

    Combines topics with Algebra with topics from college math for those whose need is a survey of mathematical principles rather than the in-depth analysis required for a mathematics or science-related program. This course begins with a course in Algebra followed immediately by a survey of college math.

    Topics of Algebra include linear equations, quadratic functions, exponential functions, and logarithmic equations with an emphasis on functions, graphing, and modeling. Topics of college math covered may include problem solving strategies, logic, numeration systems, classification of numbers, algebra, financial management, geometry, measurement and right triangle trigonometry, probability, statistics, graphs, systems of equations, linear programming. Students cannot receive credit for both MA 103 and MA 103A.

    MA 105-Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics (4)

  • Gen Ed Math

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: MA 81 or MA 83 or MA 85 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test Note: MA 105 is designed and recommended for

    Education majors in the Early Childhood Education

    and Elementary Education A.A.T. degrees only.

    Provides a comprehensive, conceptually-based background in elementary mathematics. Topics include historical development of numeration systems, decimal notation, arithmetic algorithms in decimal and other bases, elementary set theory and number theory. Intended for

    early childhood and elementary education students, or other non-STEM majors, who need a general course in problem-solving strategies, numeracy, and the real number system.

    MA 106-Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics II (4)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: MA 81 or MA 83 or MA 85 or appropriate score on the mathematics placement test Note: MA 106 is designed and recommended for

    Education majors in the Early Childhood Education

    and Elementary Education A.A.T. degrees only.

    A study of the fundamentals of geometry for early childhood education and elementary education students. Provides a conceptually based background in geometry including plane and solid, metric and non-metric, dimensional analysis, congruence and similarity, coordinate and transformational geometry. Emphasizes problemsolving skills and the appropriate use of technology including calculators and computers.

    MA 111-Precalculus (4)

  • Gen Ed Math

    Prerequisite: A grade of B or better in MA 82 or MA 85 OR a grade of C or better in MA 130 or MA 130S OR appropriate score on mathematics placement test

    Includes topics from college algebra and trigonometry with a graphing approach such as right triangle trigonometry, circular trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions, exponential functions, power functions, logarithmic functions, and polynomial functions and their zeros.

    MA 130-College Algebra (3)

  • Gen Ed Math

    Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MA 82 or MA 85 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test This class can be taken as a single semester

    course in College Algebra or as the first part of

    a two semester sequence (MA 130 and MA 131) to prepare for Calculus. Topics covered include a study of function behavior, composition, and

    inverse using linear, polynomial, rational and radical functions; definition and analysis of exponential and logarithmic functions, complex numbers, formulae of midpoint, distance and average rate

    of change, and right triangle trigonometry. Two of the following courses: MA 111, MA 130 and MA 131 may be taken for a maximum of 7 credits.

    MA 130S-College Algebra (3)

  • Gen Ed Math

    Prerequisite: A grade of B or better in MA 80 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test Combines College Algebra with topics from

    Introductory and Intermediate Algebra. Introductory

    and Intermediate Algebra topics include linear equations, absolute value, quadratic functions, exponential functions, and polynomial functions with an emphasis on functions, graphing, and modeling. College Algebra topics extend Intro/ Intermediate topics to include a study of function behavior, composition, and inverse using linear, polynomial, rational and radical functions; definition and analysis of exponential and logarithmic functions, and complex numbers.

    MA 201-Applied Calculus (3)

  • Gen Ed Math

    Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MA 130 or MA 130S or appropriate score on mathematics placement test

    A one-semester course for students in business, biology, social sciences, electronics and technical programs. Covers methods for finding the derivatives and integrals of algebraic and transcendental functions with applications in each program.

    MA 202-Introduction to Discrete Mathematics (3)

    Prerequisite: A grade of B or better in MA 82 or MA 85 or appropriate score on the mathematics placement test For the mathematics and computer science

    student. Develops problem solving skills. Topics

    include sets and logic, elementary number theory, graph theory, matrices, algorithm design, mathematical induction and recursion.

    MA 206-Statistics (3)

  • Gen Ed Math

    Prerequisite: MA 81 or MA 83 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test

    An introductory non-calculus statistics course. Topics include descriptive analysis and treatment of data, probability, statistical inference, linear regression and correlation, chi-square tests and non-parametric tests. Students can only receive credit for one of the following: MA 206 or MA 206A.

    MA 206A-Statistics (3)

  • Gen Ed Math

    Prerequisites: A grade of B or better in MA 80 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test AND placement in EN 70 or ESL 70 or higher on the reading placement test

    Combines an introductory non-calculus statistics course with topics from Algebra. Topics of Algebra include graphing and solving linear equations, inequalities, function notation and interval notation. Topics of Statistics include descriptive analysis and treatment of data, probability, statistical inference, linear regression and correlation, chi-square tests, and non-parametric tests. Students can only receive credit for one of the following: MA 206 or MA 206A.

    MA 207-Statistics with Probability (4)

  • Gen Ed Math

    Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MA 81 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test

    Introduces non-calculus statistics with additional topics in elementary probability. Statistical topics include descriptive analysis and treatment of data, statistical inference, linear regression and correlation, and chi-square tests. Topics from Elementary Probability include basic event

    and outcome concepts, fundamental rules of probability, random variables and their distributions, and expectation. Practical applications of the

    course concepts are explored through team projects. Students can only receive credit for one of the following: MA 207 or MA 207A.

    MA 210-Calculus I (4)

  • Gen Ed Math

    Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MA 111 Presents the first course in the three-semester calculus sequence (MA 210, MA 211, MA 212).

    Designed for students in mathematics, science,

    engineering, medical and other technical programs. Topics covered include: functions, limits, continuity, the derivative concept, differentiation techniques (including produce rule, quotient rule, chain rule and implicit differentiation), applications of the derivative, and definite and indefinite integral concepts. The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus is discussed and used in the context of introductory integration.

    MA 211-Calculus II (4)

  • Gen Ed Math

    Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MA 210 Presents the second of three courses in the calculus sequence. Topics include methods and

    applications of integration, improper integrals,

    sequences and series, Taylor approximations, polar functions, introduction to differential equations.

    MA 212-Calculus III (4)

    Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MA 211 Presents the final course in the three-semester calculus sequence. Topics include functions of

    several variables and their graphs, vectors, parametric

    equations, partial derivatives, multiple integrals and applications, Green's Theorem, Stokes Theorem and the fundamental theorem of line integrals.

    MA 213-Differential Equations (3) Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MA 211 AND Prerequisite or Corequisite: MA 214 Presents differential equations of order one;

    linear differential equations with constant coefficients; non-homogenous equations with undetermined coefficients; variation of

    parameters; inverse differential operators; Laplace Transform; systems of differential equations; nonlinear equations; elementary applications.

    MA 214-Introduction to MATLAB (1)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: MA 210

    Provides an introduction to MATLAB, a multi- paradigm numerical computing environment and fourth-generation programming language, including popular toolboxes. The course consists of interactive workshops with students doing sample MATLAB problems in real time. Problem-based MATLAB assignments are given which require significant time on MATLAB.

    MA 218-Linear Algebra (3)

    Prerequisite: MA 210

    Includes systems of linear equations, determinants, vectors in 2- and 3-space, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors and applications.

    MDA: Medical Assisting

    MDA 101-Foundations of Medical Assisting I (3) Prerequisite or Corequisite: MDA 109

    Introduces the professional responsibilities of the administrative and clinical medical assistant. Emphasizes interpersonal communication, records management, administrative responsibilities, financial administration and patient care activities for the physician's office.

    MDA 102-Foundations of Medical Assisting II (3) Prerequisite: MDA 101; Prerequisite or Corequisite: MDA 109

    Introduces the theory and skills necessary for a clinical medical assistant. Skills include (but are not limited to): medical asepsis, knowledge and/ or performance of blood borne pathogens/ OSHA regulations, general patient care, assisting with patient care activities, position and measurement of vital signs, health histories.

    MDA 104-Medical Assisting Clinical I (1)

    Prerequisites: MDA 102, MDA 112

    Provides supervised placement in a contracted facility for guided experience in application of knowledge and skill of business and administrative skills in a medical office. Emphasis is placed on enhancing competence in medical skills necessary for comprehensive patient care and strengthening professional communications and interactions.

    MDA 105-Medical Administration Clinical I (1)

    Prerequisites: MDA 109, MDA 112

    Provides supervised placement in a contracted facility for guided experience in the application of business and administrative skills in a healthcare office. Emphasis is placed on enhancing competence in medical office skills for comprehensive patient care and strengthening professional communications and interactions.

    MDA 108-Basic Medical Terminology (1)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72 or Corequisite: EN 75

    Provides students with the basic medical terminology framework needed before advancing to a more comprehensive medical terminology

    or anatomy and physiology based course.

    MDA 109-Medical Terminology (3) Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72 or Corequisite: EN 75

    Teaches the basic principles of building and defining medical words. Students use techniques learned

    to develop an extensive medical terminology vocabulary. No previous knowledge of anatomy, physiology or pathology is necessary.

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    MDA 110-Pharmacology for Medical Office Practice (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72; Prerequisite or Corequisite: MDA 109 Introduces students interested in medical office

    practices to the field of pharmacology. Students will

    be completing clinical and multimedia applications encountered in a clinic/doctor’s office setting.

    Applications include handwritten and electronic prescriptions, drug forms, drug labels, patient photographs, and clinical scenarios. Each anatomical system will be the subject of a unit in this course.

    This course is not intended for the nursing student.

    MDA 112-Medical/Administrative Office Applications (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: MDA 109

    Covers the general flow of information in a medical office and the role that computers play in administrative tasks. Simulation software is used to reflect today’s office environment such as variety in fee schedules, patient scheduling, and office hour organization. Students will perform additional office procedures including insurance claims and financial tasks.

    MDA 115-Phlebotomy Skills (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72 Develops skills in a variety of blood collection methods using proper techniques and standard

    precautions. Blood collection procedures

    performed include vacuum collection devices, syringes, capillary skin puncture, butterfly needles and blood culture, and specimen collection on adults. Collection of specimens from children and infants is discussed. Emphasis will be placed on infection prevention, patient

    identification, specimen labeling, quality assurance, specimen handling, processing, accessioning, professionalism, ethics, and medical terminology.

    MDA 201-Medical Assisting Laboratory Procedures (3) Prerequisite: MDA 102; Prerequisite or Corequisite: MDA 104

    Introduces the basic routine laboratory skills and techniques required for assisting with patients in the medical office. Emphasizes laboratory activities and responsibilities of the medical laboratory technician for a physician's office. Skills include (but are not limited to): collecting, handling, and examining laboratory specimens and using phlebotomy procedures according to OSHA regulations.

    MDA 202-Medical Assisting Clinical Skills (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: MDA 201

    Introduces the basic routine clinical skills and techniques required for assisting with patients in the medical office. Presents proper clinical techniques and theory behind each technique. Skills include (but are not limited to): collecting, handling, and examining laboratory specimens and using phlebotomy procedures according to OSHA regulations. Demonstrating use of clinical

    equipment including centrifuge and audiometer.

    MDA 204-Medical Assisting Clinical II (2)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: MDA 202

    Provides students with supervised patient-care experience in the medical office. Emphasis is placed on enhancing competence in clinical and laboratory skills necessary for comprehensive patient care and strengthening professional communications and interactions.

    MDA 205-Medical Administrative Clinical II (2)

    Prerequisite: MDA 216

    Provides students with supervised patient-care experience in the medical office. Emphasis is placed on enhancing competence in medical office administration for patient care and strengthening professional communications and interactions

    including accounting, billing and coding procedures.

    MDA 216-Medical Coding Basics (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 101

    Introduces the structure and conventions of diagnostic ICD (International Classification of Diseases) and procedural CPT (Current Procedural Terminology) coding. Covers a variety of medical specialties and coding issues encountered in healthcare providers offices. Broadens medical coding knowledge and enhances medical coding skills with hands-on simulations using a widely accepted medical coding software package.

    MDA 218-Health Insurance Billing and Reimbursement (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: MDA 216

    Introduces processing of health insurance claims including plan options, payer requirements, state and federal regulations, abstraction of source documents, accurate completion of claims, coding of diagnoses, and procedures/services. Includes the following types of insurance: Commercial Insurance, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Medicare, Medicaid, TRICARE, and Workers’ Compensation. Emphasis on CMS Reimbursement Methodologies will be incorporated into the curriculum.

    MDA 220-Electronic Health Records (3) Prerequisites or Corequisites: MDA 109, CIS 101 Introduces students to Electronic Health Records (EHR) through an examination of

    existing transitions and structures between medical facilities. Practical applications and guided exercises will enable the student to be prepared for changes in the healthcare field.

    MDA 222-Introduction to Federal Healthcare Programs and Laws (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Prepares students in allied health programs to enter the workforce with a basic understanding of federal healthcare programs and federal healthcare laws. The course will provide students with a knowledge of the populations receiving assistance from the government as well as identifying the federal laws that govern workers’ provisions of health services laws.

    MU: Music

    MU 101-Introduction to Music History and Appreciation (3)

  • Gen Ed Arts

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR

    (ESL 72 and ESL 73) OR Corequisite: EN 75

    Presents a study of music masterpieces of the past and present through reading, listening and analysis.

    MU 103-Fundamentals of Music (3)

  • Gen Ed Arts

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR

    (ESL 72 and ESL 73) OR Corequisite: EN 75

    Covers the basic elements of music for the interested student or prospective classroom teacher. Includes study of musical notation, terminology, major

    and minor scales, simple and compound meters, familiarity with the piano keyboard, intervals, triads, sight-singing, ear-training and simple dictation.

    MU 106-Aural and Keyboard Skills I (1)

    Prerequisite: MU 103

    Converts theoretical knowledge into practical application through sight-singing, ear-training, keyboard work and rhythmic exercises. Study concepts are derived from material introduced in Music Theory I, including major and minor scales, intervals, sequential patterns and simple melodies, rhythmic patterns, tempos, cadences, harmonization and figured bass.

    MU 107-Aural and Keyboard Skills II (1)

    Prerequisite: MU 106

    A continuation of Aural and Keyboard Skills I, coordinated with material presented in Music Theory II, including more difficult triad types and seventh chords, non-harmonic tones, part-singing, syncopated rhythms, cadences, harmonic progressions and modulations.

    MU 108-Survey of World Music (3)

  • Gen Ed Arts; Cultural Competence Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) OR Corequisite: EN 75

    Provides an introduction to the indigenous musical expressions of countries around the world, including African, Asian, Latin American, native North American and the Caribbean, emphasizing a global perspective and artistic interaction of world cultures. Considers origins, unique instruments, significant genres, notable artists, and cultural functions.

    Selected pieces are examined in detail through directed listening. Topical writing assignments are required. Music reading skills unnecessary.

    MU 109-History of American Popular Music (3)

  • Gen Ed Arts

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR

    (ESL 72 and ESL 73) OR Corequisite: EN 75 Surveys the development of American popular music in the 20th and 21st centuries, including

    the origins of both pop/rock styles, significant

    artists, cross-pollination with other genres, and impact on American culture. Selected pieces are examined in detail through directed listening. Topical writing assignments are required. Music reading skills unnecessary.

    MU 111-Music Theory I (3)

    Prerequisite: MU 103

    Presents a study of diatonic harmony through four-part writing and analysis of music. Includes sight-singing, rhythmic and melodic dictation. Private instruction is recommended concurrently.

    MU 112-Music Theory II (3)

    Prerequisite: MU 111

    A continuation of Theory I, with more advanced harmony. Introduces contrapuntal technique. Offers more advanced dictation skills, beginning composition using course skills.

    MU 117-Choral Ensemble I (1)

    Presents a variety of choral literature as the basis for study and presentation. Students participate as members of the Choral Arts Society of Frederick. Three rehearsal hours weekly. Open to all students.

    MU 118-Choral Ensemble I (1)

    Presents a variety of choral literature as the basis for study and presentation. Students participate as members of the Choral Arts Society of Frederick. Three rehearsal hours weekly. Open to all students.

    MU 119-Jazz Ensemble I (1) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor Presents great jazz literature as the basis for study and presentation. Three rehearsal

    hours weekly. Applied music in chosen instrument recommended concurrently.

    MU 120-Jazz Ensemble I (1) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor Presents great jazz literature as the basis for study and presentation. Three rehearsal

    hours weekly. Applied music in chosen instrument recommended concurrently.

    MU 121-Orchestral Ensemble I (1)

    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

    Presents great orchestral music of the Baroque, Classical, Romantic and/or Contemporary musical eras. Applied music in chosen instrument recommended concurrently.

    Students participate as members of the Frederick Orchestra. Two rehearsal hours weekly.

    MU 122-Orchestral Ensemble I (1)

    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

    Presents great orchestral music of the Baroque, Classical, Romantic and/or Contemporary musical eras. Applied music in chosen instrument recommended concurrently.

    Students participate as members of the Frederick Orchestra. Two rehearsal hours weekly.

    MU 123-Wind Ensemble I (1)

    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

    Presents a variety of wind ensemble literature as the basis for further study and presentation. Three rehearsal hours weekly. Applied music instruction in chosen instrument recommended concurrently.

    MU 124-Wind Ensemble I (1)

    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

    Presents a variety of wind ensemble literature as the basis for further study and presentation. Three rehearsal hours weekly. Applied music instruction in chosen instrument recommended concurrently.

    MU 130-Foundations of Audio Technology (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72

    Introduces components of the recording process including a detailed analysis of the nature of sound, human hearing, and basic principles of electricity. Students will learn basic digital audio workstation operation and other skills required to work in the studio.

    MU 135-Audio Recording Techniques (3)

    Prerequisite: MU 130

    Provides an in-depth exploration of microphone technology, analog and digital theory, and recording systems. Students will explore techniques for recording in the tonmeister style of engineering, particularly as it relates to microphone techniques and editing using a digital audio workstation.

    MU 141-Class Voice I (1)

    Offers class instruction in singing with emphasis on basic techniques of voice production, including correct breathing, posture, vowel production and vocal problems. Various repertoire will be studied. Open to beginners. One class hour per week.

    MU 142-Class Voice II (1)

    Prerequisite: MU 141

    A continuation of Class Voice I, including more advanced techniques of vocal production

    and technique. Repertoire from classical, folk and Broadway styles included.

    MU 145-Publishing, Licensing, and Copyrighting (3) Prerequisite or Corequisite: EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72

    Examines music publishing, licensing, and copyright procedures used by the professional musician, music administrator, and music producer.

    MU 151-Class Piano I (1)

    Offers beginning piano study in a classroom- lab setting. An electronic piano is available for class use. Introduces basic keyboard and

    musicianship skills, including selected elementary pieces. Enrollment is limited to ten people.

    MU 152-Class Piano II (1)

    Prerequisite: MU 151

    A continuation of the material presented in Class Piano I. Explores elements of theory, technique and improvisation. Topics include major and minor scale building, harmonizing scale degrees, accompaniment patterns, cadences and more. Includes solo and ensemble pieces and standard scale fingerings.

    MU 171-Class Strings I (1)

    Offered first semester for beginning students. One hour weekly.

    MU 172-First Year Piano (1) MU 173-First Year Piano (1) MU 174-First Year Voice (1) MU 175-First Year Voice (1) MU 178-First Year Brass (1) MU 179-First Year Brass (1)

    MU 180-First Year Woodwinds (1) MU 181-First Year Woodwinds (1) MU 182-First Year Strings (1)

    MU 183-First Year Strings (1) MU 184-First Year Guitar (1) MU 185-First Year Guitar (1)

    MU 186-First Year Percussion (1) MU 187-First Year Percussion (1)

    MU 206-Aural and Keyboarding Skills III (1)

    Prerequisite: MU 107; Corequisite: MU 211

    A continuation of Aural and Keyboard Skills II, coordinated with material presented in Music Theory III, including secondary dominants, Neapolitan sixth chords, augmented sixth chords, ensemble work, conducting and more complex chord progressions.

    MU 207-Aural and Keyboard Skills IV (1)

    Prerequisite: MU 206; Corequisite: MU 212

    A continuation of Aural and Keyboard Skills III, coordinated with material presented in Music Theory IV, including synthetic scales, quartal and quintal harmonies, tone rows, chromaticism, changing meters and polychords.

    MU 211-Music Theory III (3)

    Prerequisite: MU 112; Corequisite: MU 206

    A continuation of Music Theory II, with further work on modulations, dominant relationships, cadential identifications, extended part-writing procedures, four-part chorale analysis and writing, leading tone triads and diatonic seventh chords. Includes binary and ternary forms, characteristics of instrumental writing, the Neapolitan sixth chord and augmented sixth chords, harmonizations with all types of chords and figured bass symbols.

    course descriptions

    MU 212-Music Theory IV (3)

    Prerequisite: MU 211; Corequisite: MU 207

    A continuation of Music Theory III. Includes chords of the ninth, eleventh and thirteenth, evaded cadences, complex harmonic progressions, whole-tone scale and pentatonic scale, impressionistic techniques, twelve-tone writing, atonality, new sound sources, twentieth-century uses of melody, rhythm, harmony and form, extended uses of chromaticism, new notational methods, score reading and listening.

    MU 217-Choral Ensemble II (1) Continuation of MU 117-118. Three rehearsal hours weekly.

    MU 218-Choral Ensemble II (1) Continuation of MU 117-118. Three rehearsal hours weekly.

    MU 219-Jazz Ensemble II (1) Prerequisite: MU 119 or MU 120 Continuation of MU 119-120. Three rehearsal hours weekly.

    MU 220-Jazz Ensemble II (1) Prerequisite: MU 119 or MU 120 Continuation of MU 119-120. Three rehearsal hours weekly.

    MU 221-Orchestral Ensemble II (1)

    Prerequisite: MU 121 or MU 122 A continuation of MU 121-122. Three rehearsal hours weekly.

    MU 222-Orchestral Ensemble II (1)

    Prerequisite: MU 121 or MU 122 A continuation of MU 121-122. Three rehearsal hours weekly.

    MU 223-Wind Ensemble II (1)

    Prerequisite: MU 123 or MU 124

    A continuation of Wind Ensemble I. Three rehearsal hours weekly. Applied instruction in chosen instrument recommended concurrently.

    MU 224-Wind Ensemble II (1)

    Prerequisite: MU 123 or MU 124

    A continuation of Wind Ensemble I. Three rehearsal hours weekly. Applied instruction in chosen instrument recommended concurrently.

    MU 230-Studio Recording Techniques (3)

    Prerequisite: MU 135

    Focuses on contemporary recording techniques associated with popular music production. Topics include multi-track recording, overdubbing,

    MIDI, and project management.

    MU 235-Advanced Audio Production (3) Prerequisite: MU 130; Prerequisite or Corequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72

    Provides in-depth study and practical application of the tools and techniques used in professional audio recording in a variety of musical styles

    at a professional level. Includes advanced practical training in signal processing, mixing, and mastering. Additional topics include audio for video and product delivery.

    MU 240-MIDI Music Production Techniques (3)

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: MU 103

    Explores electronic music production. Students will produce electronic music using a variety

    of software and techniques. Topics will include notation, MIDI and controller programming, sampling, sequencing, virtual instruments, synthesizers, and production techniques.

    MU 251-Class Piano III (1)

    Prerequisite: MU 152

    A continuation of the material presented in Class Piano II. Students will work on greater hand independence and facility, arpeggios, chord progressions, new types of scales and secondary dominants. Includes a study of easy classics.

    MU 252-Class Piano IV (1)

    Prerequisite: MU 251

    A continuation of Class Piano III, emphasizing development of a greater repertoire and enhancement of performance skills. Students become more fluent in hand control, rhythmic ability and accompaniment patterns. Includes a study of standard national and holiday pieces, as well as additional drills in functional piano playing.

    MU 272-Second Year Piano (1) MU 273-Second Year Piano (1) MU 274-Second Year Voice (1) MU 275-Second Year Voice (1) MU 278-Second Year Brass (1) MU 279-Second Year Brass (1)

    MU 280-Second Year Woodwinds (1) MU 281-Second Year Woodwinds (1) MU 282-Second Year Strings (1)

    MU 283-Second Year Strings (1) MU 284-Second Year Guitar (1) MU 285-Second Year Guitar (1)

    MU 286-Second Year Percussion (1) MU 287-Second Year Percussion (1)

    NM: Nuclear Medicine

    NM 100-Physics and Radiation Safety in Nuclear Medicine Technology (5) Prerequisite: acceptance into the clinical program

    Introduces the atom and its structure within the context of Nuclear Medicine focusing on nuclear structure, stabilities, radioactive series, radioactive decay, and conversion laws and decay schemes. Radioactivity will be studied in terms of the exponential decay law, calculation of the mass of a radioactive sample, specific activity, half-life, and statistics of radioactive decay. The production of radionuclides will be presented with emphasis on

    methods of production and principles of a generator. Include regulations, principles and practices of radiation protection, and information particular

    to each radiologic specialty and/or modality.

    NM 102-Nuclear Medicine Technology (3) Prerequisites: acceptance into the clinical program Orientation to clinical nuclear medicine, includes medical terminology, professional ethics and

    conduct, patient care, radiation safety, and effect of radiation on living organisms.

    NM 103-Nuclear Medicine Techniques I (4) Prerequisites: acceptance into the clinical program Introduces all aspects of nuclear imaging related to skeletal, cardiac, respiratory, gastrointestinal,

    genitourinary, endocrine system, nervous system, and hematopoietic system as well as therapy procedures, oncology imaging, and infection imaging procedures. The procedures, protocols, instrumentation, and radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine imaging of these systems will be studied in detail. Some of the pathologic conditions imaged in Nuclear Medicine will also be presented.

    NM 104-Clinical Nuclear Medicine Technology I (1)

    Prerequisite: acceptance into clinical program Directed practice in a clinical affiliate hospital. Emphasizes routine diagnostic and

    therapeutic procedures. Daily image critiques

    by a licensed/certified technologist. On-site lectures by board certified nuclear medicine physicians supplement clinical experience.

    NM 105-Nuclear Medicine Techniques II (3) Prerequisites: NM 100, NM 102, NM 103, and NM 104 Introduces all aspects of advanced imaging techniques utilized in nuclear medicine and

    molecular imaging. Acquisition procedures, radiopharmaceuticals, standard uptake values, and other quantitative data related to imaging will be covered. Information on pathologic conditions related to all advanced imaging areas will be encompassed.

    NM 107-Instrumentation and Computers in Nuclear Medicine Technology (4) Prerequisites: NM 100, NM 102, NM 103, and NM 104

    Introduces both non-imaging and imaging instrumentation in nuclear medicine and the use of digital electronics and computer technology in medical imaging. Includes monitoring equipment, dose calibrators, well counters, uptake probes, liquid scintillation systems, and the gamma probe. Incorporates information on the components,

    use, and quality control of the various types of systems used for gamma and positron imaging. Includes digital image acquisition, reconstruction, postprocessing, advanced visualization, decision support, computer networking and PACS, information systems, and industry standards.

    NM 202-Clinical Nuclear Medicine Technology II (2)

    Prerequisites: NM 100, NM 102, NM 103, and NM 104 Provides directed practice in a clinical affiliate hospital/imaging center. Students will develop

    their individual clinical techniques. Daily imaging

    critiques by licensed/certified technologists and

    on-site lectures by board certified nuclear medicine physicians supplement clinical experiences.

    NM 203-Radiopharmacy and Radiation Chemistry (2)

    Prerequisites: NM 100, NM 102, NM 103, and NM 104 Presents basic skills necessary for the operation of a radiopharmacy. Includes production of radionuclides,

    FDA approval, quality control, adverse reactions,

    and transportation of radiopharmaceuticals.

    NM 204-Clinical Nuclear Medicine Technology III (4)

    Prerequisites: NM 105, NM 107, NM 202, and NM 203 Provides directed practice in a clinical affiliate hospital/imaging center. Students continue to

    develop their individual clinical techniques and

    create a clinical procedures manual. Daily imaging critiques by licensed/certified technologists and

    on-site lectures by board certified nuclear medicine physicians supplement clinical experiences.

    NM 205-Professional Development in Nuclear Medicine (2)

    Prerequisites: NM 105, NM 107, NM 202, and NM 203 Prepares students for their board certification exam. Teaches students how to develop a resume, prepare

    for an interview, and develop the professional

    knowledge, skills, and attitudes to prepare for professional employment and lifelong learning.

    NM 220-CT Principles & Instrumentation (3)

    Prerequisites: NM 204 and NM 205 OR graduate of NMT program

    Provides in-depth study of the physical principles and instrumentation in computed tomography. Covers the production of x-rays and their interactions with matter. Provides information on data acquisition

    and image reconstruction, processing, and quality. Addresses CT scanner components and operation, scanning factors, and their applications.

    NM 222-Cross-sectional Anatomy (3) Prerequisites: NM 204 and NM 205 OR graduate of NMT program

    Provides in-depth coverage of cross-sectional anatomy to include the head, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, spine, and extremities. Students will become accustomed to viewing anatomy of regions of the body in the different anatomical planes typically produced in cross-sectional imaging. In addition, pathology will be covered as it relates to its presentation on axial images. Special emphasis will be placed upon correlating and recognizing anatomical structures as they appear on medical images produced with CT, MRI, nuclear medicine, and ultrasound.

    NM 224-CT Protocols & Applications (3)

    Prerequisites: NM 204 and NM 205 OR graduate of NMT program

    Covers the various imaging protocols utilized to produce anatomy and pathology on CT images specific to the central nervous system, neck musculoskeletal system, abdomen and pelvis, musculoskeletal system, thorax, and interventional and special procedures. The student will also become familiar with contrast administration guidelines

    and timing issues related to dynamic imaging. Spiral CT, 3D reconstruction procedures, and vascular imaging are discussed and compared with routine imaging of the same anatomical regions.

    NM 226-Computed Tomography Clinical Practicum (3)

    Prerequisites: NM 204 and NM 205 OR graduate of NMT program

    Covers imaging of anatomic structures and pathology and recording the information needed to provide optimal examinations. Provides intensive, hands-on practice under the supervision of the clinical staff.

    Evaluation is based on clinical competency in all aspects of CT imaging procedures and patient care.

    NU: Nursing

    NU 50-Preparation for Nursing (0) [1] Prerequisite: Acceptance into clinical nursing program Serves as a basis for developing proficiency

    and accuracy in dosage calculation. Includes

    computations for oral, parenteral, and intravenous routes of administration for adults and children using the apothecaries, metric, and household systems of measurement.

    NU 51-Transition to Registered Nursing (0) [2] Prerequisite: Permission of director of nursing education; passing score on the Math for Medication Safety test Introduces concepts of professional nursing.

    Emphasis is on the acquisition and application of basic knowledge, skills, and professional behaviors needed for the delivery of comprehensive care to the adult client.

    NU 52-Reproductive Health Nursing (Transition to RN) (0) [1]

    Prerequisite: NU 51

    Introduces the study of the reproductive phase of family life and the specific health needs of women from adolescence to menopause. Pregnancy, labor and delivery, as well as commonly occurring alterations in women’s health are presented,

    along with the study of the newborn. Emphasis is on assimilation of knowledge, skills, and professional behaviors needed for the delivery of family-centered, comprehensive care.

    NU 54-Transition to Register Nursing (0) [3]

    Prerequisite: NU 51

    Introduces the study of the adult client with acute and chronic alterations in wellness. Emphasis is on assimilation of knowledge, skills and professional behaviors needed for the delivery of comprehensive care.

    NU 100-Success Tools for Nursing (2)

    Prerequisite: Admission into the nursing (PN or RN) clinical component Corequisite: NU 101

    Assists the beginning nursing student in developing successful study and test-taking skills. Assignments and classroom activities are designed to encourage the development of critical thinking skills required in nursing classroom and clinical settings.

    NU 101-Introduction to Clinical Nursing (6)

  • Cultural Competence

    Prerequisites: BI 103, BI 104, BI 120; passing score on the Math for Medication Safety test Introduces concepts of professional nursing.

    Emphasis is on the acquisition and application

    of basic knowledge, skills, and professional behaviors needed for the delivery of comprehensive care to the adult client.

    NU 105-Pharmacology for Nurses (2)

    Prerequisite: Passing score on the Math for Medication Safety test

    Provides instruction in basic pharmacology necessary for providing safe and effective medication administration. Content includes essential drug knowledge needed to adequately assess, administer, and evaluate drug effects in clients. Emphasis

    is on the acquisition and application of basic knowledge needed for the delivery of comprehensive care to clients in all healthcare settings.

    NU 210-Reproductive Health Nursing (3)

    Prerequisite: NU 101; passing score on the Math for Medication Safety test

    Introduces the study of the reproductive phase of family life and the specific health needs of women from adolescence to menopause. Pregnancy, labor and delivery, as well as commonly occurring alterations in women’s health are presented,

    along with the study of the newborn. Emphasis is on assimilation of knowledge, skills, and professional behaviors needed for the delivery of family-centered, comprehensive care.

    NU 211-Medical-Surgical Nursing I (7) Prerequisite: NU 101; passing score on the Math for Medication Safety test

    Introduces the study of the adult client with acute and chronic alterations in wellness. Emphasis is on assimilation and knowledge, skills, and professional behaviors needed for the delivery of comprehensive care.

    NU 212-Medical-Surgical Nursing II (4)

    Prerequisites: NU 210, NU 211; passing score on the Math for Medication Safety test

    Continues study of the adult client with increasingly complex acute and chronic alterations in health.

    Emphasis is on assimilation of knowledge, skills, and professional behaviors needed for the delivery of comprehensive care.

     

    NU 213-Medical-Surgical Nursing III (4)

    Prerequisites: NU 212, NU 214; passing score on the Math for Medication Safety test

    Continues study of the adult client with acute, complex, and critical alterations in health. Emphasis is on the adaptation of knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed for the delivery of comprehensive care.

    NU 214-Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing (3)

    Prerequisites: NU 210, NU 211; passing score on the Math for Medication Safety test

    Examines the impact of mental illness on the individual, family, and community. Explores treatment options and issues; and reviews the evidence-based principles and practice of psychiatric-mental health nursing. Emphasis is placed on the adaptation of knowledge, skills, and attitudes related to caring

    for clients with alterations in mental health.

    NU 215-Nursing Care of Children (3) Prerequisites: NU 212, NU 214; passing score on the Math for Medication Safety test Introduces the study of the pediatric client

    experiencing acute alterations in health. Client care in acute and community care settings will be explored with a focus on wellness, health promotion, and safety. Emphasis is on

    assimilation of knowledge, skills, and professional behaviors needed for the delivery of family- centered, safe, and comprehensive care.

    NU 216-Preparation for Practice (2) Prerequisites: NU 212, NU 214; passing score on the Math for Medication Safety test Facilitates the student’s adaptation into

    professional nursing practice. Explores current trends in nursing and concepts related to the nurse as a professional, a member of the health care team, and manager of client care.

    NU 218-Maternal, Child, and Family Nursing (5)

    Prerequisites: NU 211; passing score on the Math for Medication Safety test

    Introduces maternal, child, and family nursing. Focuses on the reproductive phase of family life, the specific health needs of women from

    adolescence to menopause, the healthy newborn, and pediatric clients with acute alterations in health. Emphasis is on assimilation of knowledge, skills, and professional behaviors needed for delivery of family-centered, comprehensive care.

     

    PC: Physical Science

    PC 103-Survey of Physical Science (3)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA105 or MA206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Covers selected aspects of earth science, physics, chemistry and the quantitative relationships involved in the behavior of matter. Uses simple experiments to introduce scientific topics as needed. Restricted to non-science majors. Students cannot receive credit for both PC 103 and PC 114.

    PC 104-The Water Planet: Introduction to Oceanography (3)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA 105 or MA 206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Presents a study of the ocean as a dynamic and changing entity. Emphasizes connections among disciplines in and outside the areas of science.

    Provides a basic understanding of scientific questions, complexities and uncertainties involved with the study and use of oceans.

    PC 105-Survey of Meteorology (3)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA105 or MA206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Surveys the basic physics of the atmosphere and the diagnostic tools of the meteorologist.

    Includes some discussion of applied meteorology, forecasting, pollution, and climatology. Students cannot receive credit for both PC 105 and PC 106.

    PC 106-Introduction to Meteorology (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA105 or MA206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Surveys the basic physics of the atmosphere and the diagnostic tools of the meteorologist. Includes

    some discussion of applied meteorology, forecasting, pollution, and climatology. Meets the requirement for a general education science lab course. Students cannot receive credit for both PC 106 and PC 105.

    course descriptions

    image

    PC 107-Introductory Astronomy (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA 105 or MA 206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Presents a survey of astronomy that includes a study of the physical nature of the universe, the solar system, stars, nebulae and galaxies. The laboratory includes sky observations for collection and analysis of data, photographic analysis and laboratory experiments.

    PC 108-Historical Geology (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA105 or MA206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Traces the history of the earth through time. Presents scientific theories on the origin of the earth and the evolution of life. Provides students with the tools to interpret the rock and fossil record with a focus on the geologic history

    of North America. Meets the requirement for a general education science lab course.

    PC 109-Physical Geology (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA105 or MA206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Introduces the physical and chemical processes that occur along the surface of the earth and within the earth’s interior. Topics include plate tectonics,

    earthquakes, volcanoes, rocks and minerals, geologic maps, and the origin and continual modification

    of surface features. Meets the requirement for a general education science lab course.

    PC 114-Introduction to Physical Science (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA105 or MA206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Introduces the fundamental concepts of physics and chemistry with an emphasis on matter, motion, and energy. An inquiry-based, activities- oriented approach is used that emphasizes both conceptual and quantitative understandings of the physical world. Meets the requirement of a general education science lab course. Students cannot receive credit for both PC 114 and PC 103.

    PC 115-Introduction to Earth Systems Science (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL

    73) AND (MA 81 or MA 83 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA 105 or MA 206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Presents an overview of the solid, fluid, and living parts of the Earth system with an emphasis on how those parts are interconnected and ever changing.

    An inquiry-based, activities-oriented approach is used in the course. Meets the requirement for a general education science lab course.

    PC 121-Energy and Society (3)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73); AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA105 or MA206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Explores the nature and properties of energy. Emphasizes a scientific understanding of energy and is role in the global society. Examines current and alternative energy sources used to meet the needs of a growing and developing society. Some Friday or Saturday field trips.

    PE: Physical Education

    PE 108-Body Mechanics (1)

    Examines the application of physical laws to the human body at rest or in motion, including concepts of effective, efficient and aesthetic postures, both static and dynamic. Emphasizes joint motions, care of the back and components of fitness including body compositions, flexibility, strength, muscular endurance and cardiovascular endurance.

    PE 131-Aerobics (1)

    Offers muscular and cardiovascular endurance exercises performed to music.

    PE 153-Introduction to Health and Exercise Sciences (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR

    (ESL 72 and ESL 73) OR Corequisite: EN 75 Theory course for physical education majors. Includes an orientation to the profession,

    including the relationship of physical education

    to education, current trends and practices, career opportunities and areas of research.

    PE 154-Fitness for Living (3)

  • Gen Ed Wellness

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR

    (ESL 72 and ESL 73) OR Corequisite: EN 75

    Covers the components of physical fitness, stress, care of the back, nutrition and weight control. Evaluations in all areas included through laboratory experiences.

    PE 160-Elementary Fencing (1)

    Introduces the history, safety, rules and etiquette of fencing. Teaches basic skills required to participate in a fencing match, as well as

    skills in directing and scoring a match.

    PE 161-Psychology of Sport (3) Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR

    (ESL 72 and ESL 73) OR Corequisite: EN 75 An exploration of the personality factors, including, but not limited to, motivation,

    aggression and emotion as they affect sports

    participation and motor skill performance.

    PE 165-Volleyball (1)

    Includes orientation, instruction and participation in specific skills, rules and etiquette of the sport.

    PE 166-Weight Training (1)

    Provides orientation, instruction and participation in specific weight training skills, rules, safety and etiquette of the sport.

    PE 179-Tennis I (1)

    Introduces the basic skills of tennis, including the basic grips, forehand and backhand groundstrokes, volleys and serves; covers

    the rules and etiquette of the sport.

    PE 181-Golf I (1)

    Introduces the basic skills of golf, including the grip, stance, addressing the ball, aiming, putting, chipping, pitching and the basic full swing; covers the rules and etiquette of the sport.

    PE 183-Beginning Snow Boarding/Skiing (1)

    Introduces the regulations, safety and etiquette of snowboarding/skiing. The beginner

    student will learn skills required to safely traverse the beginner slopes. Fees based on actual rental costs and to be paid at site.

    PE 184-Intermediate Snow Boarding/Skiing (1)

    Introduces the regulations, safety and etiquette of snowboarding/skiing. The intermediate student will learn the enhanced techniques to improve their current skill levels. Fees based on actual rental costs and to be paid at site.

    PE 185-Advanced Snow Boarding/Skiing (1)

    Introduces the regulations, safety and etiquette of snowboarding/skiing. The advanced student will learn the enhanced techniques to improve their current skill levels. Fees based on actual rental costs and to be paid at site.

    PE 187-Social Dance (1)

    Provides instruction in the basic partner dance forms including such dances as the waltz, swing, two-step, cha-cha, polka and fox-trot. Other contemporary dances may be included.

    PE 188-Yoga (3)

    Provides a holistic approach to understanding some of the fundamental principles and philosophies of yoga while also providing a weekly experiential Hatha (physical) practice.

    PE 190-Pilates (1)

    Introduces the history of Pilates and describes the physiological basis of exercises that promote core body strength. Includes demonstration and active student participation of Pilates movements.

    PE 191-Body Sculpting (1)

    Offers muscular strength and endurance exercises through the use of free weights, balls, and resistance tubes.

    PE 193-Social Dance II (1)

    Prerequisite: PE 187 or permission of instructor

    Social Dance II builds on the dance rhythms learned in Social Dance. The patterns to be learned will incorporate the body mechanics and technique that enable creation of body swing in the Waltz, and smoothness and polish in all the dances:

    Fox Trot, Swing, Cha-Cha, Rumba and Tango.

    PE 195-Tai Chi (1)

    Tai Chi is an unique and traditional Chinese exercise. The benefits of practice include strengthening health, preventing illness, and slowing the effects of aging. The class is designed to provide students with a basic knowledge and history of Tai Chi, and to provide

    an opportunity to learn and master Tai Chi skills.

    PE 196-Kickboxing (1)

    Provides basic fundamentals of Lethwei (Burmese Kickboxing). Basic principles, history, and styles and linguistics of the fighter will be covered. This course emphasizes safety for the student and the instructor. There will be no competitive fights or hard physical contact between students during this course. Mental and physical control as well as

    proper training etiquette will always be maintained.

    PE 198-Fitness (1)

    Engages students in full body exercises to improve fitness. Course will strive to dramatically change participant’s level of activity, muscle tone and strength. Students will be able to integrate research to understand the effectiveness of exercise, and plan and implement exercise programs.

    PE 198A-Fitness: Boot Camp (1) Engages students in full body exercises, especially utilizing body weight. The course

    strives to dramatically increase the participant’s level of muscular activity to affect positive changes in fitness levels. It also integrates fitness research with practical application for understanding the effectiveness of exercise.

    PE 198C-Fitness: Zumba (1)

    Zumba Fitness is a Latin-inspired, high-energy, cardio- dance workout that uses music and various easy-to- follow choreographed steps. Along with music styles such as Latin, Hip-Hop, Jazz, Pop, and other genres,

    Zumba incorporates interval training, alternating fast and slow rhythms, and resistance training.

    course descriptions

    PE 236-Coaching Principles (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Provides student with the knowledge to become an effective coach. Foundational areas of coaching are presented, including coaching philosophy, sport psychology, sport pedagogy, sport physiology and

    sport management. Coaching certification is possible through the American Sports Education Program.

    PE 237-Exercise Psychology (1) Introduces the psychological factors that affect exercise participation and performance.

    PE 241-Methods of Fitness and Conditioning (1)

    Designed for those who will be assisting others with exercise. Integrates fitness research and application, and emphasizes teaching methodologies employed in training programs that focus on group exercise. Students will apply teaching methodologies through individual and group training.

    PE 247-Methods of Strength Training (1) Designed for those who will be assisting others in a training program emphasizing muscular fitness. Emphasizes teaching methodologies employed in training programs that focus on muscular fitness.

    Students will apply teaching methodologies as they practice training with individuals or small groups.

    PE 249-Fitness Assessment and Business Practices (3)

    Prerequisite: BI 103 or BI 107 or permission of instructor

    Investigates the various modes and protocols used in fitness assessment and the relationship of assessment to the Personal Training business.

    PE 250-Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries (3) Prerequisite or Corequisite: EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72

    Introduces the basic principles for care and prevention of athletic injuries. Emphasis will be placed on scientific applications for recognition, diagnosis, classification, treatment and rehabilitation of body.

    PE 252-Essentials of Personal Training (4)

    Prerequisites: PE 241 and PE 247 or permission of instructor; Prerequisite or Corequisite:

    PE 249 or permission of instructor

    Capstone course in the Personal Training Program that leads to the NASM Personal Trainer certification. Course combines 3-credit lecture and 2-credit lab.

    PH: Philosophy

    PH 101-Introduction to Philosophy (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Surveys the major intellectual problems faced by great philosophers of all ages.

    PH 204-World Religions (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities; Cultural Competence Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) OR Corequisite: EN 75

    Introduces the historical background, beliefs, scriptures and practices of the world's major religious traditions including Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Shintoism, Judaism, Zoroastrianism, Christianity and Islam.

    PH 205-Ethics (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces the problems and possibilities of moral philosophy and ethical decision making.

    PH 206-Logic (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72

    Introduces basic problems in the use of logic and language. Improves the use of language and sound principles of reasoning.

    PH 207-Biomedical Ethics (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Explores some of the most troubling problems that health care professionals, physicians and lawyers as well as individual patients and their families

    are called upon to solve. Examines principles in biomedical ethics, as well as general ethical theories in major problem areas, including euthanasia and prolongation of life, genetic intervention, behavior control, experimenting with human subjects, etc.

    PH 208-Business Ethics (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces business ethics. Clarifies moral obligations and ethical dilemmas for managers who make business decisions.

    PH 209-Environmental Ethics (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Identifies the most troubling ethical dilemmas in the field of environmental protection and explores the applicability of traditional ethical theories in areas such as the depletion of non-renewable resources, population growth, responsibilities to the non-human world, responsibilities to future

    generations and environmental cost/benefit analysis.

    PH 210-Ethics and Film (3)

  • Gen Ed Humanities; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces philosophical reasoning through classic literature and film about morality (what one should do or be), ethics (why), the meanings of moral terms (called meta-ethics) in a variety

    of applied ethical issues (good character, global health, justice, neocolonialism, genocide, environmentalism, war, consumerism) and disciplines (bioethics, business ethics).

    PI: Political Science

    PI 104-American Government: National (3)

  • Gen Ed Political Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Covers basic principles of the national government: structure, powers and operations of Congress; the presidency and the Supreme Court; citizenship, elections, political parties and pressure groups.

    PI 206-Civil Liberties (3)

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72

    Provides historical background, social and political issues and leading cases establishing the present rules regarding civil liberties today.

    PLAC: Prior Learning Assessment Course

    PLAC 101-Prior Learning Assessment: Portfolio Development (1)

    Prerequisite: EN 101

    Examines and applies college-level learning gained from life experiences that align with specific courses offered by the college and are related to their educational goals. Students will document experiential learning through the assembling of various components into a portfolio, demonstrating an understanding of the portfolio development process of collecting, selecting, reflecting, and projecting. The Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) portfolio development course provides a series

    of structured activities and strategic approaches for students to prepare petitions to submit portfolios for credit from prior learning.

    PN: Practical Nursing

    PN 112-Nursing Throughout Developmental Stages (8)

    Prerequisites: NU 210, NU 211; Corequisite: PN 113 Prepares practical nursing students to provide care for adult and pediatric clients systems

    with commonly recurring physiological,

    psychological and developmental health problems. The Neuman Systems Model is used as the framework for the course. Supervised clinical experiences on medical-surgical and pediatric units in the hospital as well as observation in community-based centers are provided.

    PN 113-Issues in Practical Nursing (1) Prerequisites: NU 210, NU 211; Corequisite: PN 112 Focuses on the effective transition from student to licensed practical nurse. Emphasis is on the

    responsibilities associated with licensure, ethical and legal issues, employment strategies, continuing

    professional growth and leadership and management principles. Relevant trends in the development of the discipline of practical nursing are also emphasized.

    PS: Psychology

    PS 101-General Psychology (3)

  • Gen Ed Psychology

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Emphasizes the major factors that influence human behavior, including behavioral neuroscience, perceptual processes, consciousness, intelligence, personality and psychological disorders.

    PS 104-Issues of Drug/Alcohol Use (3) Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Presents a comprehensive study of the use of legal and illegal drugs; an analysis of the addictive and recovery process for individuals and families; a study of treatment modalities and 12-step groups; a study of the physiological and legal consequences of substance use and abuse.

    PS 202-Social Psychology (3)

  • Gen Ed Psychology

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Explores the effects of the social environment upon the human organism through the study of

    interpersonal relationships, and the social influences on cognitive processes such as social perception, attribution, persuasion, prejudice and discrimination, aggression, prosocial behavior and group interaction.

    PS 204-Psychology of Adolescence (3)

    Prerequisite: PS 101

    Explores physiological, psychological and social dilemmas of the adolescent. Considers relevant contemporary research and behavioral determinants.

    PS 205-Psychology of Aging (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces the normal physiological, psychological and sociological changes that occur during the

    life span. Emphasis on consequent behavior patterns and changing needs of the elderly. Includes study of adaptive processes, intervention techniques, strategies and availability of services.

    PS 206-Abnormal Psychology (3)

    Prerequisite: PS 101

    Explores the nature, etiology, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and possible prevention of the major classifications of psychological disorders including anxiety, mood, eating, substance-related, schizophrenic, dissociative, personality and childhood disorders.

    PS 207-Death and Dying (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces the origins and development of death attitudes and behavior. Topics include euthanasia; suicide; grief and mourning processes; the funeral system; legal rights; and coping strategies. Emphasis on death as a normal developmental event.

    PY: Physics

    PY 101-Survey of Physics (3)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN

    61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73) AND (MA 82 or MA 85 or MA 103 or MA 103A or MA 105 or MA 206 or MA 206A or MA 207 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test)

    Gives students a general background in physics and prepares those who must take a two-semester

    physics course who have not had high school physics.

    PY 201-Fundamentals of Physics (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: Completion of high school physics or PY 101 strongly recommended, and (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52]

    OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73), and MA 111 or (MA 130 and MA 131)

    Presents an introductory study of physics, with the fundamental principles of mechanics, dynamics and mechanical waves. Emphasizes

    problemsolving and modeling of physical systems.

    PY 202-Fundamentals of Physics (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisite: PY 201

    Continues the study of basic principles of physics. Topics include thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics and modern physics.

    PY 203-Introductory Physics I (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: Completion of high school physics or PY 101 strongly recommended, and (EN 70 or EN

    75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73), and MA 210 Presents an introductory study of physics covering

    the fundamental principles of mechanics, dynamics

    and mechanical waves. Emphasizes problem solving and modeling of physical systems. Physical laws

    and theories are developed by the application of calculus. Prepares students for advanced work in the physical sciences. An analytical course primarily for majors in science or mathematics.

    PY 204-Introductory Physics II (4)

  • Gen Ed Science

    Prerequisites: PY 203, MA 211

    Continues the study of fundamental principles of physics. Topics include thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics and

    modern physics. The theoretical approach and use of calculus are continued.

    PY 205-Modern Physics (4)

    Prerequisite: PY 204

    Continues from the calculus-based sequence PY 203-204, with emphasis on modern physics. Includes topics in relativity, electromagnetic theory, physical optics, quantum theory

    and atomic and nuclear physics.

    RC: Respiratory Care

    RC 100-Introduction to Respiratory Care (2)

    Prerequisite: BI 103

    Introduces respiratory care as a profession, including the healthcare environment and the respiratory

    care practitioner’s role on the healthcare team. Specific topics include the holistic concept of patient care, psychosocial issues with particular attention to death and dying, medicolegal and ethical considerations of respiratory care, and professional interpersonal relationships. Topics also include medical terminology, infection control techniques, and physical assessment methods.

    RC 102-Fundamentals of Respiratory Care (4)

    Prerequisite: BI 103

    Introduces basic respiratory care modalities, including medical gas therapy, aerosol and humidity therapy, hyperinflation therapy, and bronchial hygiene therapy. Laboratory portion of the

    course provides practical experience performing procedures presented in the didactic portion of the course in a controlled laboratory setting.

    RC 103-Pharmacology (3)

    Prerequisites: BI 104, RC 100, RC 102, RC 104 Introduces the various classifications of drugs, including drug action and effects, site of activity,

    recommended dosages and toxicity. Emphasis

    on anesthetics, bronchodilators, mucokinetics, cardiovascular agents and drugs affecting the nervous system as they apply to respiratory therapy.

    RC 104-Gas Exchange Physiology (2)

    Prerequisite: BI 103

    Focuses on the structure and function of the lung as related to gas exchange, diffusion, perfusion and ventilation-perfusion relationships. Emphasizes oxygen and carbon dioxide transport abnormalities in the gas exchange mechanisms. This will lead to and be integrated with clinical applications and interpretations of arterial blood-gas analysis.

     

    RC 105-Cardiopulmonary and Renal Anatomy and Physiology (3) Prerequisites: BI 104, RC 100, RC 102, RC 104

    Emphasizes the structure and function of the pulmonary, cardiovascular and renal systems as they relate to respiratory therapy.

    RC 107-Principles of Mechanical Ventilation (4)

    Prerequisites: BI 104, RC 100, RC 102, RC 104

    Explores general principles of gas physics, principles of airway management, intubation and the theory and operation of mechanical ventilators. Includes special problems associated with both short-term and long-term care of patients requiring artificial ventilation. Integrates arterial blood gas studies with course topics. The laboratory portion of the course takes the principles and procedures presented in lecture and apply them via procedure competency testing and simulated clinical situations.

    RC 109-Clinical Practicum I (2)

    Prerequisites: BI 104, RC 100, RC 102, RC 104 Introduces the hospital environment and patient care, including patients charts and record-keeping.

    Includes practical experience in using basic

    respiratory therapy equipment and applying it to patient care. Students perform basic respiratory therapy modalities such as oxygen therapy, aerosol therapy, IPPB, incentive spirometry and chest physiotherapy and postural drainage.

    RC 110-Clinical Practicum II (2) Prerequisite: RC 103, RC 105, RC 107, RC 109 Teaches proficiency in administering basic respiratory care procedures and handling every

    aspect of general care. Introduces the intensive care environment and the theory and practical use of mechanical ventilators. Includes practical experience in obtaining arterial blood gases.

    RC 202-Neonatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care (3)

    Prerequisites: RC 103, RC 105, RC 107, RC 110

    Provides an in-depth perspective of pediatric and neonatal respiratory care. Includes high-risk deliveries, abnormalities and diseases, and the interventions used. Discusses mechanical ventilation for the neonatal and pediatric patient. Students must satisfactorily complete competency tests on the operation of neonatal and pediatric ventilators.

    RC 203-Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Home Care (2)

    Prerequisites: RC 202, RC 204, RC 206, RC 208 Reviews all of the assessment skills, equipment, and interventions presented throughout the

    program, and applies them to the care of patients

    in alternative settings. Focus is on teaching patients to live with their diseases. A capstone course for the respiratory care program.

     

    RC 204-Cardiac Monitoring and Diagnostics (4)

    Prerequisites: RC 103, RC 105, RC 107, RC 110 Presents the theory, equipment, and techniques involved in cardiac monitoring. Recognition

    of normal values and normal waveforms will

    be emphasized as a reference for identifying abnormal and life threatening changes. Students must satisfactorily complete competency

    tests, including EKG monitoring and assembly of fluid filled monitoring systems.

    RC 205-Professional Seminar (2) Prerequisites: RC 202, RC 204, RC 206, RC 208 Prepares students for entry into clinical practice. Emphasizes preparation for the entry level and

    registry examinations given by the National Board for Respiratory Care. Provides familiarization with the prospective test matrices and uses both

    text and computer review materials. Reviews and discusses assigned current readings from various journals related to respiratory therapy.

    RC 206-Pulmonary Diagnostics (2) Prerequisites: RC 103, RC 105, RC 107, RC 110 Includes a detailed analysis of all major parameters of ventilatory measurement as

    well as diagnostic significance of deviations from predicted normal values.

    RC 207-Cardiopulmonary and Renal Pathophysiology Review (3)

    Prerequisites: RC 202, RC 204, RC 206, RC 208 Examines the effects of various diseases upon the cardiopulmonary and renal systems. Discusses

    both acute and long-term aspects of ventilatory-

    circulatory impairment. Emphasis on diseases that cause insult to the respiratory system.

    RC 208-Clinical Practicum III (2) Prerequisites: RC 103, RC 105, RC 107, RC 110 Develops advanced skills in the critical care environment regarding management of the

    patient dependent upon mechanical ventilation. Practical experiences gained in hemodynamic monitoring. Students will rotate through operating rooms to observe thoracic and cardiovascular surgeries and intubations.

    RC 209-Clinical Practicum IV (2) Prerequisites: RC 202, RC 204, RC 206, RC 208 Provides clinical experience in the pediatric/ neonatal environment as well as advanced adult

    critical care. Students rotate through neonatal and pediatric intensive care units and gain practical experience with mechanical ventilator management and various therapeutic techniques for this patient population. Students also rotate through various adult critical care areas.

    course descriptions

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    SO: Sociology

    SO 101-Introduction to Sociology (3)

  • Gen Ed Sociology

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces the student to the study of society and the impact of society upon the individual. Exemplifies social processes in cultural patterns and institutions. Examines group values at various levels of human relationship.

    SO 102-Social Problems (3)

  • Gen Ed Sociology; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Offers the study of community problems and sociological processes involved in the analysis of universal and local sociological phenomena.

    SO 201-Criminology (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Explores criminal behavior and the methods of its study, causation, types of criminal acts and offenders, punishment, correction and incarceration and prevention of crime.

    SO 202-Families and Society (3)

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Presents a comparative analysis of family organization in different societies, with reference to the urban family of Western society. Explores basic causes of change and trends in family structure and function. Topics include mate selections, marriage vows, marital prediction and child-rearing practices.

    SO 207-Sexuality and Society (3) Prerequisites or Corequisites: EN 101 and (SO 101 or SO 102 or SO 202 or PS 202 or

    PS 209 or permission of instructor)

    Introduces sexuality as a political, cultural and social issue. Examines how societies influence the development of sexual scripts, what is considered ‘normal’ and ‘abnormal’, ‘moral’ and ‘immoral, and

    explores how these beliefs influence social responses to current social problems related to sexuality.

    SO 210-Ethnic Diversity (3)

  • Gen Ed Sociology; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisite: EN 70 or EN 75 or EN 52 or ESL 99 or ESL 72 A survey of the status and treatment of ethnic groups in the United States; patterns of dominant and

    subordinate relations, prejudice and discrimination;

    historical and current problems, demographic and social background, political and social policies.

    image

    SO 212-Gender and Society (3)

  • Gen Ed Sociology; Cultural Competence

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR (ESL 72 and ESL 73)

    Introduces the scientific study of women as a multicultural group. Reviews material from the fields of psychology, sociology, anthropology, and

    medicine as it related to women. Particular effort will be made to address the experiences of women of varied races, ethnic groups, classes, national origins, and sexual orientations so that the whole concept

    of gender may be broadened to take these different experiences and different concerns into account.

    ST: Surgical Technology

    ST 100-Fundamentals of Surgical Technology I (6)

    Prerequisite: ST 120

    Develops concepts, skills and attitudes needed by students to perform as members of a surgical team. Demonstration of competence in basic skills is essential. Simulated practice time in FCC’s lab and in operating room settings along with didactic instruction prepare the student for the clinical practicum component of this course.

    ST 101-Introduction to Surgical Technology (6)

  • Cultural Competence

    Provides an overview of the functions of the surgical technologist in the perioperative environment.

    Develops the fundamental concepts and principles of microbiology, asepsis, pharmacology, anesthesia, ethical and legal considerations, patient care,

    all-hazards preparation, and teamwork.

    ST 105-Clinical Practicum (5)

    Prerequisite: ST 100

    Develops surgical technology concepts, attitudes, and skills needed by students to perform

    as professional members of a surgical team. Demonstration of proficiency is essential during the perioperative phases of surgical procedures.

    ST 120-Surgery Essentials (3)

    Prerequisites: MDA 108 or MDA 109, BI 103 and BI 104 Provides an introduction to the surgical environment and to the essential skills required of a surgical

    technologist. Emphasizes the fundamental

    concepts of sterile technique, critical thinking, and professionalism. Application and demonstration of essential surgical technology skills and concepts are required to advance in the program.

    ST 200-Fundamentals of Surgical Technology II (12)

    Prerequisite: ST 100

    Provides the student with theory and practice related to the dynamic role of the surgical technologist in classroom, laboratory, and clinical settings. Preceptored clinical experiences focus on participation during complex surgical procedures, advancement of skill level, and critical thinking.

    THR: Theater

    THR 101-Introduction to Theatre (3)

  • Gen Ed Arts

    Prerequisites: (EN 70 or EN 75) OR [(EN 50A or EN 61) and EN 52] OR (ESL 95 and ESL 99) OR

    (ESL 72 and ESL 73) OR Corequisite: EN 75 Introduces the history of drama and the theatre through reading, viewing and discussing plays.

    THR 102-Introduction to Acting (3) Offers a basic study of acting, through both a historical perspective and in-depth exercises.

    THR 107-Improvisation I (3)

    Provides students with a basic overview of modern improvisation techniques. Emphasis will be placed on techniques used to build confidence, creativity, critical thinking, and learn team building skills.

    Course offers an introduction of improvisation as a tool for professional auditions and performances.

    THR 108-Theatre Ensemble I (3)

    Provides students with an opportunity to explore the creation of a piece of theatre from the beginning stages of research, improvisation, script writing, and other play creation techniques to a final production on or off campus. Emphasis will be placed on techniques used to build confidence, creativity, critical thinking, and learn team building skills. The course will use multidisciplinary research skills on topics that are important to the class to bring a

    vibrant theatre piece with a strong community focus.

    THR 121-Stagecraft (3)

    Explores all technical aspects of play production, with emphasis on set construction, scene painting, properties and stage lighting.

    Provides laboratory experience in conjunction with campus theater productions.

    THR 203-Fundamentals of Directing (3) Addresses problems in playwriting, directing and acting. Students work on scenes and/or one-act plays.

    THR 204-Production Survey (1) Students participate in a campus theater production as a member of the production crew. May be taken for credit three times.

    THR 205-Acting Survey (1)

    Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

    Students participate in a campus theater production as a member of the cast. May be taken for credit three times.

    THR 206-Advanced Acting (3) Concentrates on characterization and dramatic improvisation.

    THR 207-Improvisation II (3)

    Prerequisite: THR 107

    Explores advanced improvisation techniques for public presentation. Emphasis will be placed on advanced techniques used to build confidence, creativity, critical thinking, and learn team building skills. The class offers an in-depth exploration of improvisation as a tool for professional auditions, performance, and character building.

    THR 208-Theatre Ensemble II (3)

    Prerequisite: THR 108

    Explores advanced methods and execution of creating, rehearsing, and producing a piece of theatre through creativity, critical thinking, and team building skills. The course will use advanced multi-disciplinary research skills on topics deemed socially relevant by the class and through improvisation, script writing, and other play

    creation techniques, the class will present a vibrant theatre piece with a strong community focus.

    THR 212-Theatre Internship (3)

    Offers an intensive study of theatrical performance, including both acting and stagecraft assignments.

    Students prepare a theatrical production for presentation during the summer.